3/1 Seminar on Implicit Bias Opens Spring Inclusion & Power Dynamics Series

Friday, February 8, 2019

The Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, the Duke Office of Faculty Advancement, & the Office of the Vice Dean for Faculty in the School of Medicine are sponsoring a year-long series of workshops focused on inclusion and power dynamics in the academic workplace. This semester, we invite the Duke community to learn more about implicit bias – how our experiences have shaped our thinking and beliefs – and ways to be more effective allies when we witness and/or experience bias.

The March 1 event is for all members of the Duke community, the April 1st & 8th events are specialized, based on one’s current role in the community: April 1st is dedicated to staff & trainees (lab managers/students/staff/postdocs/residents) and April 8th to faculty. 

Click HERE TO REGISTER for the appropriate events described here. Please note: The April 1 and April 8 workshops are full, but please register for the wait-list.  If demand is great enough, we will explore having more workshops in the summer.  There are still spaces available for the March 1 lecture by Damian Stanley.  

The March 1 event is for all members of the Duke community, the April 1st & 8th events are specialized, based on one’s current role in the community: April 1st is dedicated to staff & trainees (lab managers/students/staff/postdocs/residents) and April 8th to faculty. 


Friday, March 1: 20+ Years of Implicit Bias Research:  Behavior, the Brain, and Open Questions

3-4:30 p.m., Zener Auditorium (130 Soc/Psych)

Seminar by Damian Stanley, PhD, Psychology, Adelphi University.  

From Dr. Stanley: First described over 20 years ago, research on implicit social biases has grown exponentially, as has societal interest in both understanding and mitigating their influence over behavior. In this talk, I will discuss the history of the field, behavioral and neuroscientific findings that shed light on the nature of implicit biases and their malleability, as well as my own perspective as a social neuroscientist. Finally, I will speculate on the utility of intervention at the individual and institutional level.

Reception at 2:30 p.m. Co-sponsored by the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences

 

Monday, April 1, OR Monday, April 8: Becoming a Better Ally (BOTH SESSIONS FULL; WAIT LIST AVAILABLE)

8:30 a.m. breakfast; 8:45-11 a.m. workshop, DIBS Multipurpose Room, B035 Levine Science Research Center

Bystanders can play a vital role in mitigating the effects of implicit bias and in changing the culture of an environment. How do you support a friend or colleague who experiences a difficult workplace interaction? What if you’re there--in the moment--when the interaction occurs? The popular THEATER DELTA is back to lead these experiential, interactive 2.25-hour sessions.

Please note: The session on Monday, April 1, is designed for students, staff, postdocs, residents, lab managers, and other trainees. The session on Monday, April 8, is designed for faculty.