Dale Purves

Dale Purves

Research Professor in the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences

External Address: 
B241, LSRC Bldg., Research Drive, Durham, NC 27708
Internal Office Address: 
Box90999, Durham, NC 27708
Phone: 
919.684.6122

Overview

The Purves Laboratory is continuing to study visual perception and its neurobiological underpinnings. Ongoing investigations include understanding the perception of brightness, color, orientation, motion, and depth. The unifying theme of these several projects is the hypothesis that visual percepts are generated according to a wholly empirical strategy. The strategy represents in perception the empirical significance of the stimulus rather than its properties. This theory of vision and its relation to cortical structure and function is being explored by examining in probabilistic terms the perceptual responses of human subjects, the properties of virtual organisms that evolve in defined visual environments, and the response properties of visual cortical neurons in experimental animals. Current work is focused on the validation of the theory using natural image databases with complete information about luminance, color and range (physical geometry), asking whether the corresponding perceptual phenomenology is accurately predicted by the statistical information in these proxies of human experience. This empirical theory of vision is also being extended to understanding the phenomenology of music, and to audition more generally.

Education & Training

  • M.D., Harvard Medical School 1964

  • A.B., Yale University 1960

  • B.A., Yale University 1960

Selected Grants

Auditory Perception and Emotion Recognition in Young People at Risk for Psychosis awarded by National Institutes of Health (Collaborator). 2016 to 2019

Specific Auditory Perception Impairment and Emotion Recognition in Schizophrenia awarded by National Institutes of Health (Collaborator). 2014 to 2017

The Biological Basis of Musical Tonality awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 2009 to 2013

The Perception of Visual Space awarded by Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Principal Investigator). 2004 to 2007

A probabilistic concept of sensory cortical function awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2003 to 2006

Basic Postdoctoral Training in Neurobiology awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 1994 to 2005

Construction of Brain Circuits awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 1998 to 2003

Mechanisms of active zone action awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2000 to 2002

Basic Predoctoral Training in Neurobiology awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 1998 to 2002

Basic Predoctoral Training In Neurobiology awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 1997 to 1999

Pages

Bowling, D., and D. Purves. “A biological basis for musical tonality.” Sensory Perception: Mind and Matter, 2012, pp. 205–14. Scopus, doi:10.1007/978-3-211-99751-2_12. Full Text

Purves, Dale. “Opinion: What does AI's success playing complex board games tell brain scientists?.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 116, no. 30, July 2019, pp. 14785–87. Epmc, doi:10.1073/pnas.1909565116. Full Text

Ng, Cherlyn J., and Dale Purves. “An Alternative Theory of Binocularity..” Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, vol. 13, Jan. 2019. Epmc, doi:10.3389/fncom.2019.00071. Full Text

Bowling, Daniel L., et al. “Reply to Goffinet: In consonance, old ideas die hard..” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 115, no. 22, May 2018, pp. E4958–59. Epmc, doi:10.1073/pnas.1805570115. Full Text

Bowling, Daniel L., et al. “Vocal similarity predicts the relative attraction of musical chords..” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 115, no. 1, Jan. 2018, pp. 216–21. Epmc, doi:10.1073/pnas.1713206115. Full Text

Bowling, Daniel L., and Dale Purves. “A biological rationale for musical consonance..” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 112, no. 36, Sept. 2015, pp. 11155–60. Epmc, doi:10.1073/pnas.1505768112. Full Text

Purves, Dale, et al. “Perception and Reality: Why a Wholly Empirical Paradigm is Needed to Understand Vision..” Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, vol. 9, Jan. 2015. Epmc, doi:10.3389/fnsys.2015.00156. Full Text

Morgenstern, Yaniv, et al. “Properties of artificial networks evolved to contend with natural spectra..” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 111 Suppl 3, July 2014, pp. 10868–72. Epmc, doi:10.1073/pnas.1402669111. Full Text

Purves, Dale, et al. “How biological vision succeeds in the physical world..” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 111, no. 13, Apr. 2014, pp. 4750–55. Epmc, doi:10.1073/pnas.1311309111. Full Text

Morgenstern, Yaniv, et al. “Properties of artificial neurons that report lightness based on accumulated experience with luminance..” Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, vol. 8, Jan. 2014. Epmc, doi:10.3389/fncom.2014.00134. Full Text

Ng, Cherlyn, et al. “Network connections that evolve to circumvent the inverse optics problem..” Plos One, vol. 8, no. 3, Jan. 2013. Epmc, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0060490. Full Text

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