Jamila Minga

Jamila Minga

Assistant Professor of Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences

External Address: 
40 Medicine Circle, DUMC Box 3805, Durham, NC 27710
Internal Office Address: 
Duke South Yellow Zone 4000, DUMC Box 3805, Durham, NC 27710
Phone: 
919.681.2279

Overview

Jamila Minga, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor and speech-language pathologist with primary research interests are adult neurogenic communication disorders following stroke and stroke rehabilitation outcomes. Specifically, she is interested in investigating the impact of right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) on pragmatic communication performance and the development of population sensitive measures for determination of rehabilitation needs. It is her long-term research goal to contribute to the increased recognition and distinction of the functional impact of stroke based on hemisphere of lesion by developing a comprehensive expertise in language production deficits and representative diagnostic markers as a precursor for engineering assessments and treatment protocols to enhance functional integration of persons with brain damage into their respective communities. This goal stems from her clinical experience providing adult neurogenic rehabilitation services in acute, subacute, and skilled rehabilitation settings. Other research interests include cultural language analysis, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), and health disparities.

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., University of North Carolina - Greensboro 2014

Minga, Jamila, et al. RHDBank Grand Rounds.

Minga, Jamila, et al. “The Effects of Right Hemisphere Brain Damage on Question-Asking in Conversation.J Speech Lang Hear Res, vol. 65, no. 2, Feb. 2022, pp. 727–37. Pubmed, doi:10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00309. Full Text

Stockbridge, M. D., et al. “Aprosodia subsequent to right Hemisphere Brain damage: A systematic review and meta-analysis.” Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Jan. 2021, pp. 1–27. Scopus, doi:10.1017/S1355617721000825. Full Text

Minga, Jamila, et al. “Making Sense of Right Hemisphere Discourse Using RHDBank.Top Lang Disord, vol. 41, no. 1, Jan. 2021, pp. 99–122. Pubmed, doi:10.1097/tld.0000000000000244. Full Text

Minga, Jamila, et al. “Question Use in Adults With Right-Hemisphere Brain Damage.J Speech Lang Hear Res, vol. 63, no. 3, Mar. 2020, pp. 738–48. Pubmed, doi:10.1044/2019_JSLHR-19-00063. Full Text

Minga, Jamila. “Discourse Production and Right Hemisphere Disorder.” Perspectives of the Asha Special Interest Groups, vol. 1, no. 2, American Speech Language Hearing Association, Mar. 2016, pp. 96–105. Crossref, doi:10.1044/persp1.sig2.96. Full Text

Helling, Celeste R., and Jamila Minga. “Developing an Effective Framework for the Augmentative and Alternative Communication Evaluation Process.” Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, vol. 23, no. 2, American Speech Language Hearing Association, Apr. 2014, pp. 91–98. Crossref, doi:10.1044/aac23.2.91. Full Text

Minga, Jamila, et al. “Question use in adults with right hemisphere brain damage.” Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Minga, Jamila, et al. “The effects of right hemisphere brain damage on question asking during conversational discourse. (Accepted)Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, edited by Sarah Wallace, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Minga, Jamila, et al. “Association of Right Versus Left Hemisphere Stroke on Rehabilitation Outcomes.” Journal of Womens Health, vol. 28, no. 11, MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, 2019, pp. 1588–89.

Minga, Jamila, and Melissa Johnson. RHDBank Discourse Protocol Corpora. 2016. Manual, doi:10.21415/T5Q02B. Full Text