John Pearson

John Pearson

Assistant Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics

External Address: 
Levine Science Research Center, B255, Durham, NC 27710
Internal Office Address: 
Duke Box 90999, Durham, NC 27708
Phone: 
919.613.8338

Overview

My research focuses on the application of machine learning methods to the analysis of brain data and behavior. I have a special interest in the neurobiology of reward and decision-making, particularly issues surrounding foraging, impulsivity, and self-control. More generally, I am interested in computational principles underlying brain organization at the mesoscale, and work in my lab studies phenomena that range from complex social behaviors to coding principles of the retina.

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., Princeton University 2004

  • B.S., University of Kentucky, Lexington 1999

Selected Grants

Motor Modulation of Auditory Processing awarded by National Institutes of Health (Co Investigator). 2020 to 2025

Neurobiology Training Program awarded by National Institutes of Health (Mentor). 2019 to 2024

Neurocomputational Approaches to Emotion Representation awarded by National Institutes of Health (Co Investigator). 2020 to 2024

Receptive field coordination across mosaics of diverse retinal ganglion cell types in the mammalian retina awarded by National Institutes of Health (Co Investigator). 2020 to 2024

Corticostriatal contributions to motor exploration and reinforcement awarded by National Institutes of Health (Co-Principal Investigator). 2020 to 2023

Medical Scientist Training Program awarded by National Institutes of Health (Mentor). 1997 to 2022

Real-time, all-optical interrogation of neural microcircuitry in the pretectum awarded by National Institutes of Health (Co-Principal Investigator). 2020 to 2022

Adaptive Algorithms for Automated Circuit Dissection awarded by The Swartz Foundation (Principal Investigator). 2020 to 2021

Computational Modeling of Decision Making by Prosecutors and Jurors in Criminal Justice awarded by National Science Foundation (Co Investigator). 2017 to 2021

Pages

Chang, S. W. C., et al. “Neuroethology of primate social behavior.” In the Light of Evolution, vol. 7, 2014, pp. 115–34. Scopus, doi:10.17226/18573. Full Text

Roy, Suva, et al. “Inter-mosaic coordination of retinal receptive fields.Nature, vol. 592, no. 7854, Apr. 2021, pp. 409–13. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03317-5. Full Text

Jun, Na Young, et al. The optimal spatial arrangement of ON and OFF receptive fields. Mar. 2021. Epmc, doi:10.1101/2021.03.10.434612. Full Text

Yoo, Seng Bum Michael, et al. “Continuous decisions.Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci, vol. 376, no. 1819, Mar. 2021, p. 20190664. Pubmed, doi:10.1098/rstb.2019.0664. Full Text

Adams, Geoffrey K., et al. “Neurons in primate prefrontal cortex signal valuable social information during natural viewing.Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci, vol. 376, no. 1819, Mar. 2021, p. 20190666. Pubmed, doi:10.1098/rstb.2019.0666. Full Text

Draelos, Anne, et al. improv: A flexible software platform for adaptive neuroscience experiments. Feb. 2021. Epmc, doi:10.1101/2021.02.22.432006. Full Text

Addicott, Merideth A., et al. “Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and the explore/exploit trade-off.Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 46, no. 3, Feb. 2021, pp. 614–21. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41386-020-00881-8. Full Text

Xu, Yunan, et al. “Machine learning prediction of neurocognitive impairment among people with HIV using clinical and multimodal magnetic resonance imaging data.J Neurovirol, vol. 27, no. 1, Feb. 2021, pp. 1–11. Pubmed, doi:10.1007/s13365-020-00930-4. Full Text

Michael, Valerie, et al. “Circuit and synaptic organization of forebrain-to-midbrain pathways that promote and suppress vocalization.Elife, vol. 9, Dec. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.7554/eLife.63493. Full Text

Mohl, Jeff T., et al. “Monkeys and humans implement causal inference to simultaneously localize auditory and visual stimuli.J Neurophysiol, vol. 124, no. 3, Sept. 2020, pp. 715–27. Pubmed, doi:10.1152/jn.00046.2020. Full Text

McDonald, Kelsey R., et al. “Dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex track distinct properties of dynamic social behavior.Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci, vol. 15, no. 4, June 2020, pp. 383–93. Pubmed, doi:10.1093/scan/nsaa053. Full Text

Pages