Lawrence Gregory Appelbaum

Lawrence Gregory Appelbaum

Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

External Address: 
Duke Hospital South, 5th Floor, Red Zone, Room 54231, Durham, NC 27710
Internal Office Address: 
3862, Durham, NC 27710
Phone: 
919.613.7664

Overview

Greg Appelbaum is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the Duke University School of Medicine. He is a member of the Brain Stimulation Division of Psychiatry, where he directs the Human Performance Optimization lab (Opti Lab) and the Brain Stimulation Research Center   As a member of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences he teaches and advises in the Neuroscience major, is an affiliate of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, and has a secondary appointment in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. 

Dr. Appelbaum's research interests primarily concern the brain mechanisms underlying visual cognition, how these capabilities differ among individuals, and how they can be improved through behavioral, neurofeedback, and neuromodulation interventions. Within the field of cognitive neuroscience, his research has addressed visual perception, sensorimotor function, executive function, decision-making, and learning/expertise. In this research, he has utilized a combination of behavioral psychophysics coupled with the neuroscience techniques of electroencephalography (EEG), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). 

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., University of California at Irvine 2004

Selected Grants

Identifying the Optimal Neural Target for Misophonia Interventions awarded by (Co Investigator). 2019 to 2021

Impact of Timing, Targeting, and Brain State on rTMS of Human and Non-Human Primates awarded by National Institutes of Health (Co Investigator). 2017 to 2021

Transcranial magnetic stimulation with enhanced focality and depth (fdTMS) awarded by National Institutes of Health (Advisor). 2017 to 2021

Accurate and reliable computational dosimetry and targeting for transcranial magnetic stimulation awarded by National Institutes of Health (Collaborator). 2019 to 2021

Quiet TMS: A Low-Acoustic-Noise Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation System awarded by National Institutes of Health (Co Investigator). 2016 to 2020

Using fMRI-guided TMS to increase central executive function in older adults awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2015 to 2020

Neurophysiology and Cognitive Neuroscience (8.4): Sensorimotor Function in Elite Soldiers and Athletes awarded by Department of Defense (Principal Investigator). 2015 to 2020

Tracking Neurological Function in Warrior-Athletes: A Multidisciplinary Approach awarded by University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill (Principal Investigator). 2014 to 2015

Studies of Attention Using Combined ERPs and fMRI awarded by National Institutes of Health (Postdoctoral Associate). 2001 to 2015

Jack, J., et al. “Mapping rhetorical topologies in cognitive neuroscience.” Topologies as Techniques for a Post-Critical Rhetoric, 2017, pp. 125–50. Scopus, doi:10.1007/978-3-319-51268-6_7. Full Text

Beynel, Lysianne, et al. “Effects of online repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on cognitive processing: A meta-analysis and recommendations for future studies..” Neurosci Biobehav Rev, vol. 107, Dec. 2019, pp. 47–58. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.08.018. Full Text

Teel, Elizabeth F., et al. “A Randomized Controlled Trial Investigating the Feasibility and Adherence to an Aerobic Training Program in Healthy Individuals..” J Sport Rehabil, vol. 28, no. 7, Sept. 2019, pp. 692–98. Pubmed, doi:10.1123/jsr.2018-0007. Full Text

Addicott, Merideth A., et al. “Low- and High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Effects on Resting-State Functional Connectivity Between the Postcentral Gyrus and the Insula..” Brain Connect, vol. 9, no. 4, May 2019, pp. 322–28. Pubmed, doi:10.1089/brain.2018.0652. Full Text

Beynel, L., et al. “Online repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation during working memory in younger and older adults: A randomized within-subject comparison..” Plos One, vol. 14, no. 3, 2019. Pubmed, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0213707. Full Text

Addicott, Merideth A., et al. “Distress tolerance to auditory feedback and functional connectivity with the auditory cortex..” Psychiatry Res Neuroimaging, vol. 282, Dec. 2018, pp. 1–10. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.pscychresns.2018.10.003. Full Text

Davis, S. W., et al. “Complementary topology of maintenance and manipulation brain networks in working memory..” Sci Rep, vol. 8, no. 1, Dec. 2018. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41598-018-35887-2. Full Text

Teel, Elizabeth F., et al. “Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Aerobic Training and Common Sport-Related Concussion Outcomes in Healthy Participants..” J Athl Train, vol. 53, no. 12, Dec. 2018, pp. 1156–65. Pubmed, doi:10.4085/1062-6050-7-18. Full Text

Burris, Kyle, et al. “Sensorimotor abilities predict on-field performance in professional baseball..” Sci Rep, vol. 8, no. 1, Jan. 2018. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41598-017-18565-7. Full Text

Rao, Hrishikesh M., et al. “Sensorimotor Learning during a Marksmanship Task in Immersive Virtual Reality..” Front Psychol, vol. 9, 2018. Pubmed, doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00058. Full Text Open Access Copy

Klemish, David, et al. “Visual abilities distinguish pitchers from hitters in professional baseball..” J Sports Sci, vol. 36, no. 2, Jan. 2018, pp. 171–79. Pubmed, doi:10.1080/02640414.2017.1288296. Full Text

Pages

Clements, J. M., et al. “Neurophysiology of Visual-Motor Learning during a Simulated Marksmanship Task in Immersive Virtual Reality.” 25th Ieee Conference on Virtual Reality and 3d User Interfaces, Vr 2018  Proceedings, 2018, pp. 451–58. Scopus, doi:10.1109/VR.2018.8446068. Full Text Open Access Copy

Zielinski, D. J., et al. “Evaluating the effects of image persistence on dynamic target acquisition in low frame rate virtual environments.” Proceedings  Ieee Virtual Reality, vol. 2016-July, 2016, pp. 319–20. Scopus, doi:10.1109/VR.2016.7504782. Full Text

Donohue, Sarah E., et al. “THE EFFECTS OF RESPONSE NUMBER AND TASK ON THE ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF CONFLICT PROCESSING.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, MIT PRESS, 2013, pp. 102–102.

Martin, Rene San, et al. “NEURAL SIGNATURES OF VALUE-DRIVEN ATTENTIONAL CAPTURE PREDICT INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN ECONOMIC CHOICE.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, MIT PRESS, 2013, pp. 208–208.