Sarah Hollingsworth Lisanby

Sarah Hollingsworth Lisanby

Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

External Address: 
Room 5-4232. Red Zone, Box 3620 DUMC, Durham, NC 27710
Internal Office Address: 
DUMC Box 3620, Durham, NC 27710
Phone: 
919.613.9344

Overview

Sarah Hollingsworth “Holly” Lisanby, MD, is an experienced translational researcher and innovator of neuromodulation technologies to study and treat psychiatric disorders. Dr. Lisanby is Director of the Division of Translational Research at NIMH, which funds research on the discovery of preventions, treatments, and cures for mental illness across the lifespan.  She is Founder and Director of the Noninvasive Neuromodulation Unit in the NIMH Intramural Research Program, a multi-disciplinary clinical research program specializing in the innovation of new brain stimulation tools to measure and modulate neuroplasticity to improve mental health.  Dr. Lisanby is former Chair of the Duke Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and JP Gibbons Endowed Professor at Duke University.  She founded and directed both the Duke and the Columbia University Divisions of Brain Stimulation, where she built interdisciplinary research programs specializing in the convergence of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Engineering. She co-led the NIH BRAIN Initiative Team focused on large-scale neural recording and modulation devices. Dr. Lisanby has been principal investigator on a series of federally funded grants on the development of novel neuromodulation technologies, including the rational design of magnetic and electrical seizure therapies.  Her team pioneered magnetic seizure therapy (MST) as a novel depression treatment from the stages of animal testing, first-in-human, and international clinical trials.  She led a series of studies involving transcranial magnetic stimulation, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), MST, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. She has received numerous international recognitions, including the Max Hamilton Memorial Prize of the Collegium Internationale Neuro-Psychopharmacologicum, the Gerald Klerman Award from the National Depression and Manic Depression Association, and the Eva King Killam Research Award from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.  She has been a member of the NIMH Board of Scientific Counselors. Dr. Lisanby served on the FDA Neurological Devices Advisory Panel and has held key leadership positions with numerous professional associations, including serving as President for the Association for Convulsive Therapy/International Society of Neurostimulation, and the International Society for Transcranial Stimulation, and Chair of the American Psychiatric Association Task Force to Revise the Practice on ECT. 

Education & Training

  • M.D., Duke University School of Medicine 1991

Selected Grants

Neuromodulation Enhanced Cognitive Restructuring for Emotion Dysregulation: A Proof of Concept Study awarded by Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (Mentor). 2016 to 2019

FAST-MAS Phase 2A - Duke Site awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2013 to 2017

Janssen Resident Psychiatric Research Scholars Program awarded by American Psychiatric Association (Principal Investigator). 2015 to 2016

Rational Dosing for Electric and Magnetic Seizure Therapy awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2010 to 2016

2/8 Prolonging Remission in Depressed Elderly (PRIDE) awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2009 to 2016

Translational Research Evaluating Neurocognitive Memory Processes (TREC-MP) awarded by National Institutes of Health (Mentor). 2010 to 2016

Neural basis of cognitive reserve: fMRI/TMS studies of memory and aging awarded by National Institutes of Health (Mentor). 2010 to 2013

Neacsiu, A. D., and S. H. Lisanby. “Magnetic Stimulation for Depression: Subconvulsive and Convulsive Approaches.” Neuromodulation in Psychiatry, 2016, pp. 155–80. Scopus, doi:10.1002/9781118801086.ch9. Full Text

Lisanby, S. H., and Z. D. Deng. “Magnetic Seizure Therapy for the Treatment of Depression.” Brain Stimulation: Methodologies and Interventions, 2015, pp. 123–48. Scopus, doi:10.1002/9781118568323.ch8. Full Text

Greenberg, B., and S. H. Lisanby. “TMS in the study and treatment of anxiety disorders.” Oxford Handbook of Transcranial Stimulation, 2012. Scopus, doi:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780198568926.013.0043. Full Text

Vorel, S. R., and S. H. Lisanby. “Therapeutic potential of TMS-induced plasticity in the prefrontal cortex.” Oxford Handbook of Transcranial Stimulation, 2012. Scopus, doi:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780198568926.013.0038. Full Text

Demitrack, M. A., and S. H. Lisanby. “Methodological issues in clinical trial design for TMS.” Oxford Handbook of Transcranial Stimulation, 2012. Scopus, doi:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780198568926.013.0039. Full Text

Mantovani, A., and S. H. Lisanby. “Brain stimulation in the treatment of anxiety disorders.” Anxiety Disorders: Theory, Research, and Clinical Perspectives, 2010, pp. 323–35. Scopus, doi:10.1017/CBO9780511777578.030. Full Text

Maeda, F., et al. “Investigation of mood disorders by transcranial magnetic stimulation.” Brain Imaging in Affective Disorders, 2002, pp. 19–52.

Østergaard, Søren D., et al. “Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for moderate-severity major depression among the elderly: Data from the pride study.J Affect Disord, vol. 274, Sept. 2020, pp. 1134–41. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.jad.2020.05.039. Full Text

Pizzagalli, Diego A., et al. “Selective kappa-opioid antagonism ameliorates anhedonic behavior: evidence from the Fast-fail Trial in Mood and Anxiety Spectrum Disorders (FAST-MAS).Neuropsychopharmacology, June 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41386-020-0738-4. Full Text

Kadriu, Bashkim, et al. “Not So Fast: Recent Successes and Failures in Treating Depression.J Clin Psychiatry, vol. 81, no. 4, May 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.4088/JCP.19ac13138. Full Text

Crowell, C. A., et al. “Older adults benefit from more widespread brain network integration during working memory.Neuroimage, vol. 218, May 2020, p. 116959. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2020.116959. Full Text Open Access Copy

Cox, Morgan L., et al. “Utilizing transcranial direct current stimulation to enhance laparoscopic technical skills training: A randomized controlled trial.Brain Stimul, vol. 13, no. 3, May 2020, pp. 863–72. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.brs.2020.03.009. Full Text Open Access Copy

Krystal, Andrew D., et al. “A randomized proof-of-mechanism trial applying the 'fast-fail' approach to evaluating κ-opioid antagonism as a treatment for anhedonia.Nat Med, vol. 26, no. 5, May 2020, pp. 760–68. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41591-020-0806-7. Full Text

Beynel, Lysianne, et al. “Site-Specific Effects of Online rTMS during a Working Memory Task in Healthy Older Adults.Brain Sci, vol. 10, no. 5, Apr. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.3390/brainsci10050255. Full Text Open Access Copy

Martin, Donel M., et al. “Neurocognitive subgroups in major depressive disorder.Neuropsychology, Apr. 2020. Pubmed, doi:10.1037/neu0000626. Full Text

Moffa, Adriano H., et al. “Efficacy and acceptability of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for major depressive disorder: An individual patient data meta-analysis.Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry, vol. 99, Apr. 2020, p. 109836. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.pnpbp.2019.109836. Full Text

Balderston, Nicholas L., et al. “Mechanistic link between right prefrontal cortical activity and anxious arousal revealed using transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy subjects.Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 45, no. 4, Mar. 2020, pp. 694–702. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41386-019-0583-5. Full Text

Pages

Noh, Michelle, et al. “S112. A Spectral Method for Determining Cortical Silent Period Induced by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 85, no. 10, Elsevier BV, 2019, pp. S340–41. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.03.863. Full Text

Beynel, Lysianne, et al. “fMRI- and Computationally-Guided rTMS Enhances Performance in Working Memory Manipulation.” Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 42, NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2017, pp. S114–15.

Kellner, C., et al. “The prolonging remission in depressed elderly (PRIDE) Trial (NCT01028508): results from the randomised phase.” European Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 27, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2017, pp. S543–S543.

McClintock, Shawn, et al. “644. Neurocognitive Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) in Unipolar and Bipolar Depression: Results from an International Randomized Controlled Trial.” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 81, no. 10, Elsevier BV, 2017, pp. S261–S261. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.02.1053. Full Text

Loo, Colleen, et al. “73. Efficacy of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Unipolar and Bipolar Depression: Results from an International Randomized Controlled Trial.” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 81, no. 10, Elsevier BV, 2017, pp. S30–31. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.02.084. Full Text

Martin, Donel, et al. “641. Neurocognitive Predictors of Antidepressant Efficacy to Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Results from an International Randomized Controlled Trial.” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 81, no. 10, Elsevier BV, 2017, pp. S260–S260. Crossref, doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.02.1050. Full Text

Hu, Yupei P., and Sarah H. Lisanby. “Cognitive Behavioral Strategies During Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 79, no. 9, ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2016, pp. 122S-122S.

Peterchev, Angel V., et al. “Re-evaluating the Electroconvulsive Therapy Stimulus: Train Duration.” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 79, no. 9, ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2016, pp. 401S-401S.

McClintock, Shawn, et al. “Comparing the Effects of an Index Course of Magnetic Seizure Therapy and Electroconvulsive Therapy on Quality of Life.” Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 40, NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2015, pp. S148–49.

Hu, Yupei P., and Sarah H. Lisanby. “Cognitive Behavioral Strategies During Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Concomitant Major Depressive Disorder.” Journal of Ect, vol. 31, no. 3, LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2015, pp. E35–36.

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