Susan C. Alberts

Susan C. Alberts

Robert F. Durden Distinguished Professor of Biology

External Address: 
130 Science Drive, Rm 137, Duke Box 90338, Durham, NC 27708
Internal Office Address: 
Box 90338, Durham, NC 27708-0338
Phone: 
919.884.8714

Overview

Research in the Alberts Lab investigates the evolution of social behavior, particular in mammals, with a specific focus on the social behavior, demography, life history, and behavioral endocrinology of wild primates. Our main research focuses on one of the longest-running studies of wild primates in the world, the Amboseli Baboon Research Project, in southern Kenya, which has been ongoing since 1971.

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., The University of Chicago 1992

  • M.A., University of California - Los Angeles 1987

  • B.A., Reed College 1983

Selected Grants

A life course perspective on gut microbiome aging and health in a non-human primate model awarded by University of Notre Dame (Principal Investigator). 2021 to 2026

Genetic and Genomics Training Grant awarded by National Institutes of Health (Mentor). 2020 to 2025

Research Network on Animal Models to Understand Social Dimensions of Aging awarded by National Institutes of Health (Collaborator). 2020 to 2025

Collaborative Research: Competition within and between primate social groups: Hormonal and behavioral signatures awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 2019 to 2023

The biodemography of early adversity: social behavioral processes in a wild animal model. awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2018 to 2023

A life course perspective on the effects of cumulative early adversity on health awarded by University of Notre Dame (Principal Investigator). 2017 to 2022

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Maternal Early Life Adversity, Maternal Care, and Offspring Survival awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 2018 to 2021

LTREB Renewal: Life history and behavior in a primate hybrid zone awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 2009 to 2021

Effects of Early-life Adversity on Body Size and Immune Function in Wild Baboons awarded by L.S.B. Leakey Foundation (Principal Investigator). 2019 to 2021

Genetics Training Grant awarded by National Institutes of Health (Mentor). 1979 to 2020

Pages

Fitzpatrick, C. L., and S. C. Alberts. “Mating systems of old world monkeys.” Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior, 2019, pp. 575–79. Scopus, doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-809633-8.20690-0. Full Text

Tung, J. “Genes revisited: The biodemography of social environmental variation through a functional genomics lens.” Sociality, Hierarchy, Health: Comparative Biodemography: A Collection of Papers, 2014, pp. 39–64. Scopus, doi:10.17226/18822. Full Text

Alberts, S. C., and J. Altmann. “The Amboseli baboon research project: 40 years of continuity and change.” Long-Term Field Studies of Primates, vol. 9783642225147, 2012, pp. 261–87. Scopus, doi:10.1007/978-3-642-22514-7_12. Full Text

Loisel, D. A., et al. “Functional significance of MHC variation in mate choice, reproductive outcome, and disease risk.” Evolution in Health and Disease, 2010. Scopus, doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199207466.003.0008. Full Text

Grieneisen, Laura, et al. “Gut microbiome heritability is nearly universal but environmentally contingent.Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 373, no. 6551, July 2021, pp. 181–86. Epmc, doi:10.1126/science.aba5483. Full Text

Colchero, Fernando, et al. “The long lives of primates and the 'invariant rate of ageing' hypothesis.Nature Communications, vol. 12, no. 1, June 2021, p. 3666. Epmc, doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23894-3. Full Text

Zeng, S., et al. “Causal mediation analysis for sparse and irregular longitudinal data.” Annals of Applied Statistics, vol. 15, no. 2, June 2021, pp. 747–67. Scopus, doi:10.1214/20-AOAS1427. Full Text

Campos, Fernando A., et al. “Glucocorticoid exposure predicts survival in female baboons.Science Advances, vol. 7, no. 17, Apr. 2021. Epmc, doi:10.1126/sciadv.abf6759. Full Text

Anderson, Jordan A., et al. “High social status males experience accelerated epigenetic aging in wild baboons.Elife, vol. 10, Apr. 2021. Epmc, doi:10.7554/elife.66128. Full Text

Zipple, Matthew N., et al. “Maternal death and offspring fitness in multiple wild primates.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 118, no. 1, Jan. 2021. Epmc, doi:10.1073/pnas.2015317118. Full Text

Fogel, A. S., et al. “Genetic ancestry predicts male–female affiliation in a natural baboon hybrid zone.” Animal Behaviour, Jan. 2021. Scopus, doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2021.07.009. Full Text

Campos, Fernando A., et al. “Social bonds, social status and survival in wild baboons: a tale of two sexes.Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences, vol. 375, no. 1811, Nov. 2020, p. 20190621. Epmc, doi:10.1098/rstb.2019.0621. Full Text

Pages

Widdig, Anja, et al. “Do mothers promote social preference among their paternally related offspring? Testing mechanisms of paternal kin discrimination.” Folia Primatologica, vol. 79, no. 5, KARGER, 2008, pp. 398–398.

Alberts, Susan, et al. Data from: Better baboon breakups: collective decision theory of complex social network fissions. 19 May 2021. Manual, doi:10.7924/r4bz67v25. Full Text

Zipple, Matthew, et al. Data from: Beyond orphaned infants: novel effects of maternal death in wild primates. 26 Oct. 2020. Manual, doi:10.7924/r44f1tk8k. Full Text

Zipple, Matthew, et al. Data from: Beyond orphaned infants: novel effects of maternal death in wild primates. 26 Oct. 2020. Manual, doi:10.7924/r44f1tk8k. Full Text