Vadim Y Arshavsky

Vadim Y Arshavsky

Helena Rubinstein Foundation Professor of Ophthalmology

External Address: 
5012 Aeri, Durham, NC 27710
Internal Office Address: 
Box 3802 Med Ctr, Durham, NC 27710
Phone: 
919.668.5391

Overview

Research conducted in our laboratory is dedicated to understanding how vision is performed on the molecular level. Our most mature direction addresses the function of rod and cone photoreceptors, which are sensory neurons responsible for the detection and primary processing of information entering the eye in the form of photons. Photoreceptors respond to capturing photons by generating electrical signals transmitted to the secondary neurons in the retina and, ultimately, to the brain. Our work is dedicated to uncovering the molecular mechanisms underlying three essential photoreceptor functions: their uniquely high light-sensitivity, their ability to rapidly recover from light excitation, and their capacity to modulate light-responses upon broad variations in the intensity of ambient illumination.

Our second direction is to elucidate the cellular processes responsible for building the light-sensitive organelle of photoreceptor cells, called the outer segment, and for populating this organelle with proteins conducting visual signaling. Of particular interest is the mechanism by which outer segments form their “disc” membrane stacks providing vast membrane surfaces for effective photon capture.

Finally, we are seeking connections between understanding the basic function of rods and cones and practical, translational approaches to ameliorate the retinal degeneration caused by mutations in critical photoreceptor-specific proteins. Most importantly, we explore the link between the balance of protein synthesis and degradation in photoreceptor cells (the “proteostasis”) and the status of their health.

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., Lomonosov Moscow State Universty (Russia) 1987

  • B.S., Lomonosov Moscow State Universty (Russia) 1981

Selected Grants

Molecular mechanisms of photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2005 to 2023

In Vivo Modeling of Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency in Retinal Ganglion Cells awarded by National Institutes of Health (Mentor). 2018 to 2023

Pathological and functional consequences of dimerization-deficient rhodopsin mutations awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2019 to 2022

Center Core Grant for Vision Research awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2001 to 2021

Center Core Grant for Vision Research awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2001 to 2021

Rhodopsin dimerization: mechanistic basis and functional consequences awarded by (Principal Investigator). 2017 to 2021

Repulsive mechanisms for spatial segregation of developing neural circuits awarded by National Institutes of Health (Co-Sponsor). 2017 to 2020

Repulsive mechanisms for spatial segregation of developing neural circuits awarded by National Institutes of Health (Co-Sponsor). 2017 to 2020

The Role of Basal Bodies in Wnt Signaling awarded by National Institutes of Health (Collaborator). 2007 to 2020

Pharmacological Sciences Training Program awarded by National Institutes of Health (Participating Faculty Member). 1975 to 2020

Pages

Herrmann, R., and V. Y. Arshavsky. “The role of dopamine in fine-tuning cone- and rod-driven vision.” G Protein Signaling Mechanisms in the Retina, 2014, pp. 121–41. Scopus, doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-1218-6_8. Full Text

Martemyanov, Kirill A., and Vadim Y. Arshavsky. Biology and functions of the RGS9 isoforms.. Vol. 86, 2009, pp. 205–27. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/S1877-1173(09)86007-9. Full Text

Gospe, Sidney M., et al. “Photoreceptors in a mouse model of Leigh syndrome are capable of normal light-evoked signaling..” J Biol Chem, vol. 294, no. 33, Aug. 2019, pp. 12432–43. Pubmed, doi:10.1074/jbc.RA119.007945. Full Text Open Access Copy

Spencer, William J., et al. “PRCD is essential for high-fidelity photoreceptor disc formation..” Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, vol. 116, no. 26, June 2019, pp. 13087–96. Pubmed, doi:10.1073/pnas.1906421116. Full Text

O’Koren, Emily G., et al. “Microglial Function Is Distinct in Different Anatomical Locations during Retinal Homeostasis and Degeneration..” Immunity, vol. 50, no. 3, Mar. 2019, pp. 723-737.e7. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.immuni.2019.02.007. Full Text

Dexter, Paige M., et al. “Transducin β-Subunit Can Interact with Multiple G-Protein γ-Subunits to Enable Light Detection by Rod Photoreceptors..” Eneuro, vol. 5, no. 3, May 2018. Pubmed, doi:10.1523/ENEURO.0144-18.2018. Full Text Open Access Copy

Lobanova, Ekaterina S., et al. “Increased proteasomal activity supports photoreceptor survival in inherited retinal degeneration..” Nat Commun, vol. 9, no. 1, Apr. 2018. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/s41467-018-04117-8. Full Text Open Access Copy

Sharif, Ali S., et al. “C8ORF37 Is Required for Photoreceptor Outer Segment Disc Morphogenesis by Maintaining Outer Segment Membrane Protein Homeostasis..” J Neurosci, vol. 38, no. 13, Mar. 2018, pp. 3160–76. Pubmed, doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2964-17.2018. Full Text

Travis, Amanda M., et al. “Dopamine-Dependent Sensitization of Rod Bipolar Cells by GABA Is Conveyed through Wide-Field Amacrine Cells..” J Neurosci, vol. 38, no. 3, Jan. 2018, pp. 723–32. Pubmed, doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1994-17.2017. Full Text

Salinas, Raquel Y., et al. “Photoreceptor discs form through peripherin-dependent suppression of ciliary ectosome release..” J Cell Biol, vol. 216, no. 5, May 2017, pp. 1489–99. Pubmed, doi:10.1083/jcb.201608081. Full Text

Pearring, Jillian N., et al. “Loss of Arf4 causes severe degeneration of the exocrine pancreas but not cystic kidney disease or retinal degeneration..” Plos Genet, vol. 13, no. 4, Apr. 2017. Pubmed, doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1006740. Full Text

Ploier, Birgit, et al. “Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants..” Nat Commun, vol. 7, Oct. 2016. Pubmed, doi:10.1038/ncomms12832. Full Text

Pages

Skiba, Nikolai P., et al. “Identification of protein components of the rod outer segment plasma membrane by label-free protein correlation profiling.” Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 59, no. 9, ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC, 2018.

Maddala, Rupalatha, et al. “Deficiency of S100A4, a Ca2+-binding protein, Induces Expression of Neuronal S100A5 and the Retinal Specific Transcriptome in mouse lens.” Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 59, no. 9, ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC, 2018.

Lobanova, Ekaterina, et al. “An increase in proteolytic capacity delays photoreceptor loss in retinal degeneration.” Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 58, no. 8, ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC, 2017.

Pearring, JN, San Agustin, JT, Lobanova, ES, Gabriel, CJ, Monis, WJ, Lieu, EC, Stuck, MW, Arshavsky, VY, and Pazour, GJ. "Loss of Arf4 causes severe degeneration of the exocrine pancreas but not cystic kidney disease or retinal degeneration." 2017.

Baker, Sheila A., et al. “Investigating Synaptophysin Targeting to the Photoreceptor Synapse.” Faseb Journal, vol. 26, 2012.

Baker, Sheila A., et al. “Investigating Synaptophysin Targeting to the Photoreceptor Synapse.” Faseb Journal, vol. 26, FEDERATION AMER SOC EXP BIOL, 2012.

Sokolov, M., et al. “Phosducin regulates the level of transducin expression in rod photoreceptors.” Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 46, ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC, 2005.

Nishiguchi, K., et al. “Defects in RGS9 or its anchor protein R9AP in patients with bradyopsia, a novel form of retinal dysfunction.” Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 46, 2005.

Nishiguchi, K., et al. “Defects in RGS9 or its anchor protein R9AP in patients with bradyopsia, a novel form of retinal dysfunction.” Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 45, ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC, 2004, pp. U382–U382.

Martemyanov, K. A., et al. “The interaction between the DEP domain of RGS9 and R9AP determines subcellular localization and stability of the RGS9-G beta 5 GTPase activating complex in photoreceptors.” Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 45, ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC, 2004, pp. U798–U798.

Pages

Bownds, M. Deric, and Vadim Y. Arshavsky. “How many light adaptation mechanisms are there?.” Behavioral and Brain Sciences, vol. 18, no. 03, Cambridge University Press (CUP), Sept. 1995, pp. 496–496. Crossref, doi:10.1017/s0140525x00039546. Full Text