Complete Course Listing

Please note: This is a listing of courses typically offered. See Current Course Offerings for accurate information on the current course schedule.



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Gateway Course

Summer Session II, 2016 MTUWTHF 09:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Instructor: Giattino, Charles M

An introduction to the methods, models, and reasoning that have led to discoveries about brain-behavior relations. Topics covered include: Nervous system development and function, brain anatomy, the biological basis of visual auditory, taste and smell perception, learning, memory, reward, drugs and addiction, psychological and neurological disorders, feeding, and sex.

AoK: NS/MoI: STS

Prerequisites: Basic biology background at high school or college level.

Fall 2017, TUTH 11:45 AM - 01:00 PM
Instructor: Karen Murphy

An introduction to the methods, models, and reasoning that have led to discoveries about brain-behavior relations. Topics covered include: Nervous system development and function, brain anatomy, the biological basis of visual auditory, taste and smell perception, learning, memory, reward, drugs and addiction, psychological and neurological disorders, feeding, and sex.

AoK: NS/MoI: STS

Prerequisites: Basic biology background at high school or college level.

Fall 2017, WF 03:05 PM - 04:20 PM
Instructor: Minna Ng

Introduction to neuroscience that explores methods, models, and reasoning that led to discoveries about brain-behavior relations. Students learn and apply concepts in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, synaptic transmission, the somatic sensorimotor system, vision, emotions, attention & consciousness, memory & learning, sexual differentiation & orientation, and psychopathology. In-class experiences organized around principles of team-based learning, with students collaborating in small teams for readiness assessments and team applications. Course fulfills gateway requirement for Neuroscience major. Freshman are welcome.

Cross list:  PSY 107.01

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: Basic biology background at high school or college level.

Spring 2017, WF 3:05PM - 4:20PM, LSRC DIBS B035
Instructor: Minna Ng

Introduction to neuroscience that explores methods, models, and reasoning that led to discoveries about brain-behavior relations. Students learn and apply concepts in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, synaptic transmission, the somatic sensorimotor system, vision, emotions, attention & consciousness, memory & learning, sexual differentiation & orientation, and psychopathology. In-class experiences organized around principles of team-based learning, with students collaborating in small teams for readiness assessments and team applications. Course fulfills gateway requirement for Neuroscience major. Freshman are welcome.

Cross list:  PSY 107.01

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: Basic biology background at high school or college level.

Core Courses

Fall 2017, MW 01:25 PM - 02:40 PM
Instructor: Thomas Newpher

Introduction to neuroscience, including: basic physiology; microstructure and anatomy of neural tissues; mechanisms of neuronal development and integration; sensory-motor control; auditory, visual, and olfactory systems; the neural foundations of animal behavior; and the evolution of nervous systems. Emphasis on the development and critical evaluation of neuronal theories of brain function using biochemical, mathematical, and/or deductive/inductive models of reasoning and experimentation.


Prerequisites: Chemistry 31L or equivalent; NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107 is required for Neuroscience majors; must have completed or be currently enrolled in Biology 201L or 202L; not recommended for first-year students

2017 Summer 2, MTUWTHF 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Instructor: Thomas Newpher

Intro to neuroscience: basic physiology; microstructure & anatomy of neural tissues; mechanisms of neuronal development & integration; sensory-motor control; auditory, visual, & olfactory systems; neural foundations of animal behavior; evolution of nervous systems. Emphasis on development & critical evaluation of neuronal theories of brain function using biochemical, mathematical, and/or deductive/inductive models of reasoning and experimentation. Prerequisites: Chemistry 101DL or equivalent; Neuroscience 101/102/Psychology 106/107 required for Neuroscience majors; must have Biology 20 credit or completed or be currently enrolled in Biology 201L or 202L; not recommended for first year students.

STS, NS

Prerequisites: Chemistry 101DL or equivalent; Neuroscience 101/102/Psychology 106/107 required for Neuroscience majors; must have Biology 20 credit or completed or be currently enrolled in Biology 201L or 202L; not recommended for first year students.

Fall 2017, TU 03:05 PM - 05:35 PM
Instructor: Henry Yin

Introduces students to behavioral neuroscience—the study of how the brain generates behavior. Focus on detailed biological mechanisms underlying specific behaviors in many organisms, especially mammals. Topics covered include control of movement, sleep, learning and memory, motivation, emotion, and decision-making.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102 or PSY 106 or 107, and/or NEUROSCI 201

Fall 2017, TUTH 03:05 PM - 04:20 PM
Instructor: Tobias Egner

The biological bases of higher brain function, including perception, attention, memory, language, emotion, executive functions and consciousness. Emphasis on human brain function at the macroscopic network-level, and the current theories and controversies in this rapidly growing field. Course is not recommended for Freshmen.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101/PSY 106 or NEUROSCI 102 or PSY 102 or NEUROSCI 201/PSY 275/BIOLOGY 224

Spring 2017, MWF 06:30 PM - 07:20 PM
Instructor: Courtnea Rainey

The biological bases of higher brain function, including perception, attention, memory, language, emotion, executive functions and consciousness. Emphasis on human brain function at the macroscopic network-level, and the current theories and controversies in this rapidly growing field. Course is not recommended for Freshmen.

(IMPORTANT NOTE:  If you are using NEUROSCI 102 to count as your pre-req for this course, please email the instructor to obtain a permission number to enroll into the course.  There was a mistake in setting up the pre-reqs and NEUROSCI 102 was left off of the programming.)

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101/PSY 106 or NEUROSCI 102 or PSY 102 or NEUROSCI 201/PSY 275/BIOLOGY 224

2017 Summer 2, MTUTH 02:00 PM - 04:05 PM
Instructor: Sali, Anthony W

The biological bases of higher brain function, including perception, attention, memory, language, emotion, executive functions and consciousness. Emphasis on human brain function at the macroscopic network-level, and the current theories and controversies in this rapidly growing field. Course is not recommended for Freshmen.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107, or PSY 102 or NEUROSCI 201/PSY 275/BIOLOGY 224

Fall 2016, TUTH 01:25 PM - 02:40 PM
Instructor: Nina Sherwood, Pelin Volkan

Molecular and cellular components underlying nervous system function. Topics include the regulation of the neuronal cytoskeleton, process outgrowth and axon guidance, transport mechanisms, the generation and propagation of the action potential, components of the presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, growth factors in development and regeneration, neuronal stem cells, and sensory signal transduction. Lectures by the instructor and expert guests, with regular readings of current and/or historical primary literature.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or NEUROSCI 102 or PSY 106 or 107 and BIO 201L or equivalent

Spring 2017, MWF 3:05PM - 4:20PM, Gross Hall 103
Instructor: Thomas Newpher

Molecular and cellular components underlying nervous system function. Topics include the regulation of the neuronal cytoskeleton, process outgrowth and axon guidance, transport mechanisms, the generation and propagation of the action potential, components of the presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, growth factors in development and regeneration, neuronal stem cells, and sensory signal transduction. Lectures by the instructor and expert guests, with regular readings of current and/or historical primary literature.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102 or PSY 106 or 107 and BIO 201L or equivalent

2017 Summer 1, MTUWTHF 09:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Instructor: Wentzell, Jill

Molecular and cellular components underlying nervous system function. Topics include the regulation of the neuronal cytoskeleton, process outgrowth and axon guidance, transport mechanisms, the generation and propagation of the action potential, components of the presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals, growth factors in development and regeneration, neuronal stem cells, and sensory signal transduction. Lectures by the instructor and expert guests, with regular readings of current and/or historical primary literature.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102 or PSY 106 or 107 and BIO 201L or equivalent

Statistics Courses


Instructor: Staff Department

Principles and applications of statistics in biology, with emphasis on genetics, molecular biology, ecology and environmental science. Topics include: the presentation of biological data, summary statistics, probabilities and commonly-applied probability distributions, the central limit theorem, statistical hypothesis tests, errors and power, tests using the z- and t-distributions, correlation and regression, analyses of variance and covariance, non-parametric tests, and sampling design. Not open to students who have credit for another 100-level statistics course. Instructor: Magwene

AoK: NS, QS

Prerequisites: Not open to students who have credit for another 100-level statistics course.


Instructor: Staff Department


Introduction to statistical methods used in psychological research. Topics in applied statistical methods: measures of central tendency and variability; probability and distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; t-test and analysis of variance; correlation and regression; chi-square tests. Calculate and interpret statistics referencing data and research questions typical in psychological research. Includes a lab section with instruction in management and analysis of data using statistical software designed for use in social science research. Required for the major. Prerequisites: two Psychology or two Neuroscience courses or one Psychology and one Neuroscience course or consent of department. Instructor: Shelby or Staff

AoK: QS

Prerequisites: Pre-Req PSY 201: Two Psychology or two Neuroscience courses or one Psychology and one Neuroscience course. Restriction: Not open to students who have taken an upper level STA course.


Instructor: Department Staff

Introduction to statistics as a science of understanding and analyzing data. Themes include data collection, exploratory analysis, inference, and modeling. Focus on principles underlying quantitative research in social sciences, humanities, and public policy. Research projects teach the process of scientific discovery and synthesis and critical evaluation of research and statistical arguments. Readings give perspective on why in 1950, S. Wilks said "Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary a qualification for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write." See department website for placement information. Not open to students with credit for Statistics 102 or higher.  Instructor: Cetinkaya-Rundel or Stangl.

AoK: QS/MoI: R; STS

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

Not open to students with credit for another STA 100-level course.


Instructor: Staff Department

Reading and interpretation of statistical analysis from life and health sciences. Topics include: basic concepts and tools of probability, estimation, inference, decisions analysis, and modeling. Emphasizes role of biostatistics in modern society. See dept website for placement info. Not open to students with credit for another STA 100-level course. Instructor: Schmidler or Stangl

 Aok: QS/MoI: R, STS

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info. Not open to students with credit for another STA 100-level course.


Instructor: Staff Department

Basic laws of probability - random events, independence and dependence, expectations, Bayes theorem. Discrete and continuous random variables, density, and distribution functions. Binomial and normal models for observational data. Introduction to maximum likelihood estimation and Bayesian inference. One- and two-sample mean problems, simple linear regression, multiple linear regression with two explanatory variables. Applications in economics, quantitative social sciences, and natural sciences emphasized. Instructor: Heller or Mukherjee

AoK: QS

Prerequisites: Mathematics 21 or equivalent. Not open to students who have credit for another 100-level statistical sciences course.


Instructor: Staff Department

Introduction to probability, independence, conditional independence, and Bayes' theorem. Discrete and continuous, univariate and multivariate distributions. Linear and nonlinear transformations of random variables. Classical and Bayesian inference, decision theory, and comparison of hypotheses. Experimental design, statistical quality control, and other applications in engineering. Instructor: Li or Mukherjee

AoK: QS

Prerequisites: Mathematics 212 or equivalent. Not open to students who have taken Statistical Science 250 or 611.


Instructor: Staff Department

Probability models, random variables with discrete and continuous distributions. Independence, joint distributions, conditional distributions. Expectations, functions of random variables, central limit theorem. Prerequisite: Mathematics 22, 112L, 122, 122L, 202, 212, 222, OR Graduate student; Not open to students who have credit for Mathematics 340 Instructor: Staff

AoK: QS

Prerequisites: Mathematics 22, 112L, 122, 122L, 202, 212, 222, OR Graduate student; Not open to students who have credit for Mathematics 340

Electives: Methods and Laboratory Courses

Spring 2017, M 3:05PM - 5:05PM and TuTh 3:05PM - 4:20PM, Allen 103
Instructor: Jennifer Groh, Owen Astrachan

COMPSCI 103L/NEUROSCI 103L -01 Computing and the Brain

Introductory programming based on problems in neuroscience. Provides foundational skills for using computers to collect and analyze neuroscience data. Study of how computational processes are implemented by information-processing entities: both brains and computers. Python programming to generate sensory stimuli and collect/analyze behavioral and neural data. Scientific and Software Engineering best practices for conducting and verifying neuroscience experiments. Not open to students who have taken Computer Science 101. Prerequisite: Neuroscience 101/Psychology 106 or Neuroscience 102/Psychology 107.

(NS) Natural Sciences
(QS) Quantitative Studies

IMPORTANT NOTE:  Enroll into the COMPUTING AND THE BRAIN (Lecture), M 3:05PM - 5:05PM, part of the course first (the Monday one); and then you should automatically be placed in the NEUROSCI 103L-001 (9255) lecture part.

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107 Bio Bases of Behavior

This course can either be used as a Neuroscience Methods Elective or to complete the Chem/Compsci requirement for the AB in Neuroscience, but not both.

Spring 2017, TUTH 08:30 AM - 09:45 AM, Sociology Psychology 127
Instructor: Warren Grill, Yiyang Gong

The electrophysiology of excitable cells from a quantitative perspective. Topics include the ionic basis of action potentials, the Hodgkin-Huxley model, impulse propagation, source-field relationships, and an introduction to functional electrical stimulation.

Instructor: Henriquez, W. Neu, Sommer

Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 244L and (Biomedical Engineering 253L or Electrical and Computer Engineering 110L or equivalent; Mathematics 353

Fall 2016, TUTH 01:25 PM - 02:40 PM
Instructor: Thomas Newpher

Explore the wide spectrum of methods commonly used in the field of neuroscience; ranging from molecular/genetic to electrophysiology and whole brain imaging. Multiple units of this team-based learning course will include interaction with a scientist currently practicing the technique.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107, and BIO 101L or equivalent

Fall 2016, THIS GOT CANCELLED MW 03:05 PM - 04:20 PM
Instructor: Staff Department

Explores capacities and limitations of human sensory systems. How the sense organs detect objects and events and what brains then do with that information. Concentrates primarily on the visual system, with some forays into other sensory modalities. Prerequisites: Psychology 102 or 106. Prior course in statistics is strongly recommended. Instructor: (Occasionally Groh)

Prerequisites: Psychology 102 or 106

Fall 2017, M 04:40 PM - 07:10 PM
Instructor: Leonard White

Overview of the structure of the human brain and spinal cord with team-based learning approaches and laboratory-based discover. Hands-on examination of human brain specimens with guided explorations of external and internal brain structures. Dissections of human brains to facilitate discovery. Extensive use of interactive digital media to explore the gross anatomy of the central nervous system and the organization of the major neural systems underlying sensory, motor and cognitive function. Analysis of actual clinical cases representing a variety of neurological disorders.

AoK: NS, STS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107 or NEUROSCI 201 and instructor consent

Fall 2017, Study abroad
Instructor: Daniel Rittschof

Sensory physiological principles with emphasis on visual and chemical cues. Laboratories will use behavior to measure physiological processes. (Given at Beaufort.)

 

AOK: NS

MOI: R, W

Prerequisites: AP Biology or introductory biology or consent of instructor and Chemistry 101DL

Spring 2017, Tu 8:30AM - 9:45AM and Tu 10:05AM - 11:20AM, Perkins Link 070
Instructor: J. Tobias Overath

Overview of use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) in the investigation of human sensory, motor, and cognitive function. Topics will include FMRI to study human brain systems involved with movement, sensation, perception, and memory. Students will design and execute a neuroimaging experiment. Prerequisites: Gateway class in Neuroscience; Statistics and Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience are strongly recommended.

AoK: NS/MoI: R

Prerequisites: Instructor consent required.

Fall 2017, W 03:05 PM - 06:20 PM
Instructor: Marty Woldorff

Combined lecture/lab course on the event-related potential (ERP) method and its use in cognitive neuroscience. ERPs—electrical brain waves triggered by sensory and cognitive events—provide a powerful means to noninvasively study the timing and sequence of the neural activity underlying cognitive processes. How ERPs are generated, recorded, and analyzed, how they are used to study cognitive processes, and their relationship to other measures of brain activity. Students gain direct experience with the method in the lab.

AoK: NS, MoI: R, W

Prerequisites: Two of the following: Psychology 106, 102, 257 or 275. Prior course in statistics and proficiency with computers strongly recommended.

Fall 2017, TUTH 1:25 PM - 3:55 PM
Instructor: Pelin Volkan

Gain skills necessary to conduct neuroscience research and integrate findings from multiple levels of analysis (molecular, cellular and behavioral). Team-based learning format and collaboration with neuroscience lab to generate, analyze, and communicate novel scientific findings. Experimentation will occur in a model organism and may include PCR, live cell imaging and/or behavioral conditioning experiments.

AoK: NS/MoI: R, W

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107 and BIO 101L or 102L and NEUROSCI 114

SPRING 2016, MW 01:25 PM - 02:40 PM
Instructor: Patrick Wolf

This course will be an exploration of analog and digital signal processing techniques for measuring and characterizing neural signals. The analog portion will cover electrodes, amplifiers, filters and A/D converters for recording neural electrograms and EEGs. The digital portion will cover methods of EEG processing including spike detection and spike sorting. A course pack of relevant literature will be used in lieu of a textbook. Students will be required to write signal-processing algorithms.

Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 354L

Fall 2016, WF 11:45 AM - 01:00 PM
Instructor: Craig Henriquez

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of computational modeling of neurons and neuronal circuits and the decoding of information from populations of spike trains. Topics include: integrate and fire neurons, spike response models, homogeneous and inhomogeneous Poisson processes, neural circuits, Weiner (optimal) adaptive filters, neural networks for classification, population vector coding and decoding. Programming assignments and projects will be carried out using MATLAB.

Prerequisites: BME 301L or equivalent

Spring 2017, WF 3:05PM - 4:20PM and F 1:25PM - 2:40PM
Instructor: Wanda Neu

Study of the origins of clinically-relevant electrical signals, such as EEG, ECG, or EMG. Generation of biopotentials by active cells, fibers, and tissues. Transmission of biopotentials to the measuring electrodes through intervening tissues; effects of inhomogeneities and anisotropy. Students develop models of biopotentials and learn numerical and mathematical tools for solving and analyzing these models. Laboratory exercises based on computer simulations, with emphasis on quantitative behavior. Readings from original literature. Prerequisite: BME 301L or consent of the instructor.

NEUROSCI 511L-001 INTERMEDIATE BIOELECTRICITY (Lecture) - Wanda Neu

WF 3:05PM - 4:20PM Hudson Hall 139 (24)

NEUROSCI 511L-01L INTERMEDIATE BIOELECTRICITY (Laboratory) - Wanda Neu

F 1:25PM - 2:40PM Sociology Psychology 127 (35)

Prerequisites: BME 301L or consent of the instructor.

Spring 2017, TUTH 03:05 PM - 04:20 PM Hudson Hall 232
Instructor: Warren Grill

Covers several systems that use electrical stimulation or recording of the nervous system to restore function following disease or injury. For each system, the underlying biophysical basis for the treatment, the technology underlying the treatment, and the associated clinical applications and challenges are examined. Systems to be covered include cochlear implants, spinal cord stimulation of pain, vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy, deep brain stimulation for movement disorders, sacral root stimulation for bladder dysfunction, and neuromuscular electrical stimulation for restoration of movement.

Prerequisites: BME 301L; BME 253L or ECE 110L or equivalent; consent of the instructor

Electives: Research Courses

Fall, Spring, and Summer
Instructor:

Introduction to faculty-directed research, often preparing the student for independent study. (at least 6 hrs/week)

Prerequisites: Instructor consent required.


Instructor:

Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, resulting in a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Meets general requirement of a curriculum Research (“R”) course. (at least 10-12 hrs/wk) May be repeated. Continued in NEUROSCI 494,495,496.

MoI: R


Prerequisites: Open to all qualifying students with consent of supervising instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies.


Instructor:

Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, resulting in a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Meets general requirement of a curriculum Research (“R”) course. (at least 10-12 hrs/wk)  May be repeated. Continued in NEUROSCI 495,496.

MoI: R

Prerequisites: Open to all qualifying students with consent of supervising instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies.


Instructor:

Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, resulting in a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Meets general requirement of a curriculum Research (“R”) course. (at least 10-12 hrs/wk) May be repeated. Continued in NEUROSCI 496.

MoI: R

Prerequisites: Open to all qualifying students with consent of supervising instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies.


Instructor:

Individual research in a field of special interest, under the supervision of a faculty member, resulting in a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Meets general requirement of a curriculum Research (“R”) course. (at least 10-12 hrs/wk)

MoI: R

Prerequisites: Open to all qualifying students with consent of supervising instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Electives: Intersection Courses

Spring 2017, TUTH 03:05 PM - 04:20 PM
Instructor: Maurizio Forte

ARTHIST 89S.01
FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR (TOP)
Topic: THE ANCIENT MIND
TUTH 03:05 PM - 04:20 PM
Forte, Maurizio
18 / 1

See course catalog for desription.

This is a First Year Seminar owned by Art History and cross listed with the following.

CLT 89S.01(18)
NEUROSCI 89S.01(18)
CULANTH 89S.03(18)

Prerequisites: See course catalog

Fall 2017, WF 1:25PM - 2:40PM
Instructor: Maryann Murtagh

There are innovative and exciting conversations happening right now in
twenty-first century psychoanalytic discourse around the topic of research in the neurosciences. Some
scholars even say “the brain is becoming the new phallus.” This is because the old phallus in
psychoanalysis refers to the penis. For Freud, the penis was the central organizing organ for every
subject’s development whether the trajectory was through castration anxiety for boys or penis envy
for girls. The idea of a “new phallus,” however, picks up on French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan’s
designation of the term where "phallus” refers to any object that signifies some meaning organized in
such a way to make it desirable. The brain as the new phallus or object of desire is prompted by its
status as an enigmatic organ. Like the penis, the brain is beginning to occupy a privileged site which
tends to symbolically hierarchialize the remainder of the body beneath it.

Our goal this semester will be to dissect, deconstruct, and destabilize why the human brain stands as
the central and primary defining organ of subjectivity. To do this, we will rethink the brain’s
relationship to the central nervous system, to surfaces of the body, to external stimuli, and to the
environment. We will also consider how gender, race, and varying levels of ability attend to important
variations in the human brain and how non-human mammalian brains, non-mammalian brains, and
non-brained living organisms exist and function. This course will explore these questions in a twofold
way: firstly, we will seek to destabilize the signified status of the brain as unified object; and secondly,
we will attempt to de-hierarchalize this phallic positionality by considering its role within larger,
distributed, multimodal networks. In this way, we will engage with a number of texts in continental
philosophy, feminist science studies, (plant and) animal studies, and media & technology that remain
highly critical of the brain as a unified phallic object as it stands in twenty-first century neoliberal,
positivist, global-capitalist discourses today.

Prerequisites: tbd

Fall 2015, WF 03:05 PM - 04:20 PM
Instructor: Phillip Stillman

In this course we’ll explore what the study of fiction can tell us about the understanding of personhood we get from neuroscience, and what neuroscience can tell us about the fictional protagonists that we identify with as people. We’ll read scientific texts and novels side by side to see what connections and parallels emerge. Students will be asked compare scientific accounts of how the brain works with the actions, decisions and experiences of fictional characters. Are characters guided by deliberation or impulse, internal fantasies or external sensations? From there we’ll figure out how different models of consciousness entail different possibilities for free will, sympathy, and personal identity, and we’ll consider the various ethical and political implications that follow. The neuroscience reading-list will consist of highly popular work by authors like Oliver Sacks and Antonio Damasio, and other relevant media like the Radiolab podcast. Fiction may include modernists like Woolf or Joyce, sci-fi like Phillip K. Dick or Octavia Butler, and contemporary fiction by authors like Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro, David Mitchell and Cormac McCarthy. Together we’ll see how neuroscience can give us new ways to read fiction, and by studying fiction we’ll get better at seeing how neuroscience tells stories of its own.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

Spring 2018 MW 04:40 PM - 05:55 PM
Instructor: Kadivar, Mohsen

The diverse interactions of religion and science from the Renaissance to the present. The profound transformation of premodern science by seventeenth-century revolutions and nineteenth-century discoveries; in turn, the transformation of society, including religion, by modern science. Some consideration of physics and astronomy, but major focus on the impact of Darwinian anti-teleology and modern biology, especially animal studies, on "natural theology" and traditional arguments from design. Thinkers to be considered include Francis Bacon, Montaigne, Spinoza, Thomas Huxley, Albert Einstein, and E. O. Wilson. Topics include evolution, human consciousness, human identity, and the human-animal boundary.

 

Areas of Knowledge
CZ
 
Modes of Inquiry
CCI, STS

Prerequisites: see course catalog

TUTH 03:05 PM - 04:20 PM Spring 2017
Instructor: Deborah Jenson

FRENCH 481.01 FLAUBERT'S BRAIN NEUROHUMANITI

See coure catalog for description.

This course is owned by French and is cross listed with the following:
LIT 246.01(18)
NEUROSCI 241.01(18

Prerequisites: See course catalog

Summer Term I, 2016
Instructor: Deborah Jenson, Marianne Wardle

Exploration of creativity and the relationship between literature, the arts, neuroscience and cognition. Focus on French and intercultural exemplars on the meaning of movement, literature, and visual art. Text readings and discussions examine the context of modern Parisian culture, the history of neurology, psychiatry, and related developments in arts and literature and the cognitive processes involved in the creation of and perception of art, theater, dance, and literature, such as memory, expectation, imagination, emotion, aesthetics, reason, and perceptual knowledge. Lecture in English with a separate French section for students with advanced French skills registered under French 342A. Offered through the Duke Neurohumanities in Paris program.

AoK: ALP, NS, MoI: STS

Prerequisites: Instructor consent required.

Summer Session I, 2016,
Instructor: Leonard White, Elizabeth Johnson

Explores mimesis i cognition and culture as an emergent product of perceptual and motor processing.  Topics include touch proprioception, vision, visual psychophysics, and visual perception, motor control, embodied cognition, and functional anatomy of the human brain.  Exploration of neuroscience theories and controversies in the context of France entails observation of social and performative movement, phenomenological examination of visual art, and experiential studies of contemporary Parisian culture.  Instruction in English.  Offered in Duke Neurohumanities in Paris program.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: Prior completion of NEUROSCI 101 or 102 or PSY 106 or 107 or any NEUROSCI Focus Program course recommended.

Instructor consent required.

Spring 2017, MW 10:05, 11:45 AM, Perkins Link 071
Instructor: Scott Huettel, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong

Focus on emerging ethical controversies concurrent with advances in neuroscience. Background material covered: concepts and methods in neuroscience; theories of ethics and morality from philosophy, law, and other fields. Ethical topics covered: biological bases of morality; emotions and decision making; neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; pathologies of mind and behavior; volition and legal culpability. Course format: combined lectures, discussion, interactive activities, with case studies and real-world examples (e.g., neuroimaging as legal evidence).

AoK: NS, SS/MoI: EI, STS

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in neuroscience and/or ethical inquiry.

Fall 2017, MW 11:45AM - 01:00PM
Instructor: Christina Williams, Ara Wilson

Debates about sexuality, sex, and gender extend well beyond the walls of the academy or the science laboratory to be found in living room conversations, policy discussions, religious sermons, and popular culture. These debates hinge on radically different ideas about the relative effects of biological forces vs. social forces, or nature vs. nurture. This course changes the terms of the arguments about sexuality and gender and nature/nurture. First, the course explores how nature/nurture emerged as a scientific and popular debate. We give time to both “sides” of the debate, presenting perspectives from biological and brain sciences as well as social-construction theories. We then turn attention to new developments in science and cultural fields that are now reconsidering how biology and environments interact. The course showcases debates about how sex and sexuality is formed through the interplay of genetic information, hormones, material bodies, and social environments and reflect on the implications of these new directions for law, policy, and popular understandings concerning sex. Course requires regularly writing (response papers), quizzes, and a final project.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

Fall 2017, TuTh 03:05 PM - 04:20 PM
Instructor: Dale Purves

The course will explore the tone combinations that humans consider consonant or dissonant, the scales we use, and the emotions music elicits, all of which provide a rich dataset for exploring music and auditory aesthetics in neurobiological terms. Analyses of speech and music indicate that the chromatic scale (the set of tones used by humans to create music), consonance and dissonance, worldwide preferences for a few dozen scales from the billions that are possible, and the emotions elicited by music in different cultures stem from the relative similarity of musical tonalities and the characteristics of voiced (tonal) speech. Our brains have evidently evolved to associate these two domains.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

SPRING 2017, Th 4:40PM - 7:10PM, Biddle 104
Instructor: J. Tobias Overath, Scott Lindroth

Musical perception and performance from artistic, subjective and neuroscientific perspectives. Presentations and didactic musical performances address how our brain detects and represents music, distinguishing music from other sounds, how we learn to perform and create music, the effects of music on brain structure and function, musical schema, and musical antecedents/analogues in non-humans. Dialog between course directors, a professional musician and neuroscientist, highlights the intersection between artistic and scientific perspectives on this fundamental and aesthetic form of human expression. Background in music and/or neuroscience preferable, but not required.

Important Registration Note:  Final enrollment cap will be raised to 40, (4 Sr, 4 Jr, 20 Soph, 12 Fr). If class is closed, add yourself to the wait list and you will be added to the course if a seat becomes available.

AOK:  ALP, NS

MOI:  STS

Prerequisites: n/a

Spring 2017, MW 11:45 AM - 01:00 PM, Friedl Bldg 102
Instructor: Antonio Viego

LIT 390S.02  SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE
Topic: BRAINS, EVERYWHERE

Literature course with the following cross lists:

NEUROSCI 290S.01(18)
GSF 390S.02(18)
ROMST 390S.01(18)
LSGS 290S.02(18)

Prerequisites: See course catalog

Electives: Lecture Courses

Fall 2016, TUTH 03:05 PM - 04:20 PM
Instructor: Felipe De Brigard

Owned and cross listed by Philosophy

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

Fall 2017, MW 10:05 AM - 11:20 PM
Instructor: Scott Huettel

How new research in neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and behavioral economics shapes our understanding of decision making. Topics include functional organization of key brain systems, approaches to measuring and interpreting neuroscience data, methods for measuring decision-making behavior, economic and cognitive modeling, and impact of neuroscience on real-world decision-making. Emerging topics will include applications in policy, marketing, and finance. Prior coursework in neuroscience or decision sciences is strongly recommended.

AoK: NS, SS / MoI: STS

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in neuroscience or decision sciences is strongly recommended.

Fall 2017, WF 10:05 AM - 11:20 AM
Instructor: Ahmad Hariri

What brain circuits give rise to the dazzling diversity of human behavior, and how do even subtle disturbances within these circuits lead to abnormal behavior or psychopathology? This course provides students with a working knowledge of the brain circuits that create order in our social, emotional and cognitive worlds, and how disorder within these circuits leads to a broad range of psychopathology including depression, anxiety, phobias, PTSD, OCD, addiction, autism, schizophrenia, psychopathology and violence.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107

Spring 2017, TuTh 11:45AM - 1:00PM, Sociology Psychology 127
Instructor: Karen Murphy

Addresses neurobiology of movement, sports and other forms of physical performance at a variety of levels, from biochemical and physiological to cognitive and behavioral. Starting with neurophysiology of muscle development and movement and progressing through use of imagery and cognitive training, we will discuss the variety of neurobiological processes involved in athletic performance, as well as methods used to study these processes. Explores neuromuscular diseases, injuries and dysfunctions as well as use of exercise and movement as therapy for neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular disorders.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107

Spring 2017, MW 10:05AM - 11:20AM, Biological Sciences 154
Instructor: Vikas Bhandawat

Physiology of single neurons, and how they come together to form a circuit. Ideas about how circuits encode information. Operation of neural circuits, and experimental and theoretical approaches to unravel them. Principles underlying sensory, motor and decision-making circuits. A range of model systems from small (leech, stomatogastric ganglia) to medium (fruitflies and bees) and large (songbirds, mice, primates) will be introduced. Design principles and constraints that have shaped the nervous system during evolution will be discussed.

AOK: NS

Prerequisites: Biology 201L and Chemistry 101DL or equivalent.

Fall 2017, TUTH 10:05 AM - 11:20 AM
Instructor: Rochelle Schwartz-Bloom

This is a concept-driven course that covers the mechanisms by which drugs act in the body. Specific topics include, basic pharmacokinetics, drug-receptor interactions, drug resistance, tolerance, toxicity, and drug interactions. The course integrates biology & chemistry by using examples of drug action on the autonomic & central nervous sytems, cardiovascular & endocrine systems, treatment of infections and cancer. Concepts from cell biology, anatomy, biochemistry, neurochemistry & physiology are covered.

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102 or PSY 106 or 107; BIO 101L is highly recommended

Spring 2017, TuTh 10:05AM - 11:20AM, Nanaline Duke 147
Instructor: Cynthia Kuhn

Mechanisms by which psychoactive drugs act. Changes that occur with chronic use of drugs; drug abuse and dependence. Social and legal implications of psychoactive drugs. Designed for both science and nonscience majors. Emphasis on the reasoning, research designs, and methods for understanding drug effects.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107; Introductory Biology and Chemistry

TUTH 01:25 PM - 02:40 PM
Instructor: Staci Bilbo

An exploration of the interactions among the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems, and their consequences for neural function and behavior, using examples from both the human and animal literatures. Topics include the role of the immune system in cognition and emotions, neuroendocrine-immune interactions during stress, and the effects of stress on health and disease. The potential role of infections in the etiology of psychopathology (autism, schizophrenia) and neurodegenerative conditions (Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s) will also be discussed.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: One of the following: PSY 106 or 107/ NEUROSCI 101 or 102, PSY 275 / BIOL 224 / NEUROSCI 201, BIO 101L, or equivalent

Spring 2017, W 10:05AM - 12:35PM, LSRC B240
Instructor: Kevin LaBar

A formal research and training component of the Trinity College Forum in Neuroscience that includes review of directed reading and research in both theoretical and experimental neuroscience. Emphasis on the development of the ability to critically evaluate empirical research and to construct mathematical or deductive/inductive models. Final project includes preparation of a formal research proposal and a review of the role of ethics in science.

AoK: NS/MoI: EI, R, W

Prerequisites: Enrollment in an independent study and consent of instructor required; restricted to students pursuing Graduation with Distinction in Neuroscience

Fall 2015, MW 01:25 PM - 02:40 PM
Instructor: Warren Grill

This course presents a quantitative approach to the fundamental principles, mechanisms, and techniques of electrical stimulation required for non-damaging and effective application of electrical stimulation.

Prerequisites: Instructor consent

Fall 2017, MW 1:25PM - 2:40PM
Instructor: Warren Grill

This course presents a quantitative approach to the fundamental principles, mechanisms, and techniques of electrical stimulation required for non-damaging and effective application of electrical stimulation. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Grill



Prerequisites: Instructor Consent Required

Spring 2017, TuTh 11:45AM - 1:00PM, Social Psychology 126
Instructor: Marc Sommer

Course for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students to provide them with an understanding of the neuronal circuits that move our bodies and with techniques for analysis, simulation, and modification of these circuits by neural engineers. Topics start in the periphery with muscles, the spine, and functional electrical stimulation; then proceed centrally to subcortical circuits, deep brain stimulation, and forward models; and conclude with cerebral cortical networks and population decoding. Students are expected to have background in bioelectricity and Matlab programming. Prerequisites: BME 301L or consent of the instructor. Instructor: Sommer

Prerequisites: BME 301L or consent of the instructor.

Fall 2016, TUTH 11:45 AM - 01:00 PM
Instructor: Edna Andrews

Focus on cognitive processes and brain mechanisms involved in language comprehension and production. Psycholinguistic models and how these models may be implemented in the brain.

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

Fall 2017, MWF 03:20 PM - 04:40 PM
Instructor: Theodore Slotkin

Drug absorption, distribution, excretion, and metabolism. Structure and activity relationships; drug and hormone receptors and target cell responses. Consent of instructor required.

Prerequisites: introductory biology; CHEM 151L; MATH 31 and 32

Fall 2015, TUTH 01:25 PM - 02:40 PM
Instructor: Yiyang Gong

This course introduces students to the various modern tools used to study the function of the brain, and the underlying biophysics of these tools. Content will focus on novel technologies and techniques that employ electrophysiology and optogenetics, and specific topics include: patch-clamp electrophysiology, multi-electrode recordings, fluorescent proteins, optically excitatory or inhibitory rhodopsins, optical microscopy, fluorescent protein sensors, genetic delivery technologies, and numerical analysis or simulation of brain activity. The course will use lectures and recently published scientific literature to probe the capabilities and applications of these tools in current neuroscience experiments.

Prerequisites: Basic levels of physics and statistics. Consent of instructor required.

Electives: In-depth Seminar Courses (351 and above)

TuTh 1:25PM - 2:40PM, Sociology Psychology 129
Instructor: Lawrence Appelbaum

This class will address brain and behavioral plasticity that results from intensive practice and experience over short timeframes. Topics covered will include therapeutic applications of biofeedback, brain and behavioral changes due to expertise, and cognitive training, among others.

Prerequisites: PSY 106 or 107 or NEUROSCI 101 or 102 AND at least one of the following: PSY 275/NEUROSCI 201/BIO 224, PSY 276/NEUROSCI 211, PSY 257/NEUROSCI 212

Spring 2017, TuTh 3:05PM - 4:20PM, Perkins Link 088
Instructor: Thomas Newpher

Explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms that alter brain function in diverse neurological disorders, with an emphasis on understanding how disruptions of neural circuits drive behavioral and cognitive dysfunction. Students read and critically evaluate primary literature on topics including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, ALS, autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injuries. Classes utilize a combination of lectures, invited guest speakers, and team-based learning exercises to create a highly interactive learning environment.

AoK: NS, MoI W

 

Prerequisites: Completion of NEUROSCI 201 or concurrent enrollment.

Spring 2017, WF 1:25PM - 2:40PM, LSRC B240
Instructor: Dale Purves

Course explores how what we see is generated by the visual system. Since the eye and brain cannot access the physical properties of the world, it is hard to understand the behavioral success of biological vision. Students learn how the visual system links stimulus patterns with reproductive success without ever recovering real-world properties and without invoking feature detection, image representation in the brain, and probabilistic inference. Course considers in broader terms the relationship between the objective world and subjective human experience. Course delivered in “flipped” format with all lectures assigned as videos and class time devoted entirely to discussion of papers, problems and different perspectives on how the visual brain operates.

AoK: NS, MoI: W

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 212

Fall 2017, WF 11:45 AM - 1:00 PM
Instructor: Nicole Schramm-Sapyta, Andrew Muzyk

This Bass Connections Brain and Society Team will explore the impact of opiate addiction and overdose on the Durham Community and Duke Health System.  This year's team will preform a pilot study to explore distribution of the overdose reversal drug, naloxone, in the Emergency Department.

Prerequisites: Bass Connections

Spring 2017, TuTh 3:05PM - 4:20PM
Instructor: Nina Sherwood

This course investigates the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying common nervous system disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s) and mental illnesses (Schizophrenia, Depression, addiction). Introductory lectures on each disease and the evolution of our mechanistic understanding are followed by journal club-style discussions (i.e., individual student presentations with active class participation) of recent primary literature and experimental techniques in the field.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 201(114) or 223 or BIOL 220 or consent of instructor


Instructor: Pelin Volkan

Lectures on molecular pathways regulating development and assembly of neural networks in the brain through out the lifespan of the organism. Comparative exploration of sensory neural circuits in different model systems (fly, worms, and rodents). Includes discussion of the classic and recent literature.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: BIOL 201L and BIOL 223


Instructor: J. Tobias Overath

An exploration of how sound is processed in brain, providing an introduction to stages of information processing from ears to auditory cortex and beyond. Methods of data acquisition (e.g., fMRI, electrophysiology, psychoacoustics) are introduced along with their advantages and pitfalls. Sound and auditory perception are discussed, starting with basic properties such as frequency, loudness, pitch, and timbre, progressing to human speech and music. A textbook, primary research papers and scholarly reviews are assigned. 

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: An interest in all forms of sound and music and completion of NEUROSCI 201 or NEUROSCI 212 are strongly recommended.

Fall 2017, W 01:25 PM - 03:55 PM
Instructor: Vikas Bhandawat

Focus on understanding how visual systems adapt to an animal's requirement. About a third of the course will focus on understanding the evolutionary processes that shape the visual system. The remaining 2/3 will focus on understanding the neural processes underlying vision. A comparative approach—comparing invertebrate vs. vertebrate vision will be used to highlight different ways in which visual information is processed. Introduction of methods used to study vision (and brain function) from "single molecules to whole organism."

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: BIOL 201L or 202L and one course in neurosciences. Not open to students who have taken BIOL/NEUROSCI 521S

Fall 2017, TU 03:05 PM - 05:35 PM
Instructor: Sonke Johnsen

Exploration of recent and classic studies in sensory biology. Actual topics are chosen by students at the start of the semester. Usually includes vision, hearing, smell, taste, pheromones, electroreception, magnetoreception, bioluminescence, touch, time, and music. 

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: BIO 201L, or BIO 201L and 202L, or the equivalent, and one course in neuroscience, or consent of instructor.

Fall 2017, TUTH 11:45 AM - 01:00 PM
Instructor: Edna Andrews

In-depth analysis of PET, fMRI, MEG, EEG/ERP studies of multilingualism and their implications for linguistic theory. A close examination of the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological aspects of imaging studies and the importance of neurofunctional explanations play a central role in building new theoretical paradigms of acquisition, maintenance and loss of languages.

AoK: NS, MoI: R, STS

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

Fall 2017, TU 03:05 PM - 05:35 PM
Instructor: David Rubin

A review and critical analysis of the literature, theory, and empirical study of autobiographical memory withing cognitive psychology and neuroscience.  Levels of analysis from the cultural, individual, neural systems, and neurobiological are integrated.  Topics include accuracy, functions including planning for future actions, and effects of neural damage.  Emphasis on the reasoning, research designs, and methods used in examing autobiographical memory.  Research projects use primary and secondary materials, empirical observations, or reanalysis of existing data.

(PSY 451S)

AoK: SS, NS
MoI: R

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107, or PSY 102 or NEUROSCI 201/PSY 275/BIOLOGY 224

Fall 2017, TUTH 01:25 PM - 02:40 PM
Instructor: Thomas Newpher

An active, team-based learning seminar addressing the neurobiological mechanisms of learning and memory. Focusing on the cellular basis of information encoding and retrieval, this course enables you to evaluate contemporary findings, design experiments and synthesize and communicate conclusions

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: Psychology 257, 275, 276 or Biology 223/Neuroscience 223 or permission of instructor

Fall 2017, Tu 1:25PM - 3:55PM
Instructor: Gregory Samanez-Larkin

Advanced seminar that evaluates whether neuroscientific research can improve human decision making and make the world a better place for individuals and society. Focus on a broad range of decisions and behaviors related to growing up and growing old, spending money, judging and interacting with others, maintaining emotional, cognitive, and physical health, and protecting the planet. Reading and discussion of primary scientific sources and scientific reviews. Must have basic knowledge of human neuroimaging (especially fMRI). 


Prerequisites: Neuroscience 212/Psychology 257, Neuroscience/Psychology 258, Neuroscience/Psychology 280, or Neuroscience 382/Psychology 303


Instructor: Tobias Egner

Review and critical analysis of current and historical perspectives on functional neuroanatomy of the prefrontal cortex. Discussion is informed by anatomical, neuropsychological, neurological, neuroimaging, animal models, and computational approaches. Open to juniors and seniors majoring in psychology or neuroscience, and to graduate students.

Prerequisites: Instructor consent required.

FALL 2017, M 3:05PM - 5:35PM
Instructor: Roberto Cabeza

Research on the neural correlates of memory in humans. Neuropsychological studies with brain-damaged patients and functional neuroimaging studies with healthy individuals. Cognitive neuroscience models of memory, including episodic memory, working memory, semantic memory, priming, and procedural memory.

Prerequisites: PSY 102 or PSY 106/107/NEUROSCI 101 or 102

Spring 2017, WF 10:05AM - 11:20AM, Social Sciences 109
Instructor: Nicole Schramm-Sapyta

Biological and psychological mechanisms of reward and addiction from a “molecules to mind” perspective. Topics include: neural mechanisms of reward, vulnerability to addiction, self-medication, addiction as a learning process, animal models of addiction, gateway drugs, roles of stress and impulsivity, adolescence, genetic vs. environmental predisposition, neural alterations resulting from drug intake.

AoK: NS, W

Prerequisites: NEUROSCI 101 or 102/PSY 106 or 107 or NEUROSCI 114 and at least 2 prior classes in neuroscience

Spring 2017, Tu 3:20-5:50PM
Instructor: Henry Yin

Behavioral analysis and neural mechanisms underlying goal-directed and voluntary actions—how they are driven by the needs and desires of the organism and controlled by cognitive processes that provide a rich representation of the self and the world. Models of behavioral and cognitive control and their neural mechanisms and the implications of such models for psychiatric disorders, consciousness, free will, and responsibility will be discussed. In addition to participation in class discussion, students will be required to complete short weekly writing assignments.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: Exploring the Mind courses or PSY106 or 107/NEUROSCI 101 or 102 and at least one other psychology or neuroscience class. Prerequisite: NEUROSCI 101 and NEUROSCI 201.

SPRING 2017, TH 03:05 PM - 05:35 PM
Instructor: Felipe De Brigard

One or more topics such as mental causation, animal minds, artificial intelligence, and foundations of cognitive science. Includes relevant literature from fields outside philosophy (for example, psychology, neuroscience, ethology, computer science, cognitive science).

Prerequisites: Instructor consent required.

Fall 2016, TH 03:05 PM - 05:35 PM
Instructor: Karen L. Neander

One or more topics such as mental causation, animal minds, artificial intelligence, and foundations of cognitive science. Includes relevant literature from fields outside philosophy (for example, psychology, neuroscience, ethology, computer science, cognitive science). Instructor: De Brigard or Neander

Contact the Philosophy Department for more information.

 

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

SPRING 2017,
Instructor: Ahmad Hariri

Evaluates research showing that the integration of psychology, neuroimaging, pharmacology and genetics can illuminate specific biological pathways that help shape risk for and emergence of psychopathology. Topics include the design and analysis of multimodal research (fMRI, PET, pharmacology, molecular genetics) examining the biological underpinnings of behavioral traits relevant to psychopathology.

AoK: NS

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in biological psychology and instructor consent required.

Fall 2016, TU 08:45 AM - 11:15 AM
Instructor: Staff Department

Survey and in depth discussion of the methods, theory, and current research in the field of behavioral and computational neuroscience. Emphasis on animal models and neurobiological underpinnings of learning, memory, and cognition. Covers the latest developments in research on neuroanatomical, cellular and molecular substrates of behavior with emphasis on the influence of development, environment, and experience across the lifespan.

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

Electives: Allied Courses


Instructor: Coggins

Chemistry of the constituents of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids and their metabolic interrelationships.

Prerequisites: two semesters of organic chemistry.


Instructor: Buchler, Haase, McClay, Siedow, and Wray

Introduces major concepts in biology through the lens of molecular biology. Molecular mechanisms that comprise the Central Dogma and variants. DNA structure and function, replication, transcription, and translation. Protein synthesis, folding, structure and function. Supporting topics related to the structure of cells, metabolism and energetics. Integration of physical and quantitative principles to molecular biology. Relevance to human diseases and the biotechnology industry. Laboratory includes an introduction to recombinant DNA technology.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 101DL, or equivalent.


Instructor: Noor, Willis or Staff

Introduction to principles transmission genetics and evolution. Includes Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, quantitative genetics, genetic mapping, evidence for evolution, natural selection, genetic drift, kin selection, speciation, molecular evolution, phylogenetic analysis. Relevance to human family and social structure, evolution of infectious disease, human hereditary disorders, social implications of genetic knowledge.

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Armaleo

Application of contemporary molecular techniques to biological problems.  Questions addressed on protein-DNA binding, protein domain structure and function, differential gene expression, protein localization.  Techniques include genetic transformation, gel mobility shift assay, Western blot, Northern blot, PCR, RT-PCR, microarrays, immunolocalization, DNA sequencing.  Students learn to write three scientific-style papers on their experiments.

Prerequisites: Biology 201L or 202L


Instructor: Baugh, McClay, D. Sherwood, or Staff

The role of genes and proteins in mediating basic cellular and development processes. Topics include: structure and function of cellular membranes and organelles; protein targeting and transport; signal transduction; role of the cytoskeleton in cell shape and motility; function of the immune system; genetic regulation of cell growth/division and the relationship to cancer; genetic control of development processes.

Prerequisites: Biology 201L


Instructor: Susan Alberts

How animal behavior is shaped by natural selection, historical factors, and ecological constraints. These factors considered in the context of mating systems, parental care, foraging, and other current issues in behavior.

Prerequisites: Biology 201 or 202L.


Instructor: Wise

Physiology of marine animals with emphasis on comparisons between marine vertebrates and humans. Focus on physiological processes including gas exchange, circulation, osmoregulation, metabolism, thermoregulation, endocrine, neural control and sensory systems. Lectures and laboratories illustrate the methodology, analysis techniques, and written reporting of physiological research. One course (fall, spring); one and one-half courses (summer). (Given at Beaufort).

Prerequisites: AP biology, introductory biology, or consent of the instructor, and Chemistry 101DL


Instructor: Grunwald

Non-laboratory version of Biology 329L. Does not carry the R or W curricular designations. Not open to students who have taken BIO 329L or BME 244L.

Prerequisites: Biology 20 or 201L and Physics 141L and Chemistry 101DL


Instructor: Patek

Examination of physiological principles that guide animal life processes. Framed in an evolutionary context, processes including respiration, circulation, neural control, movement, excretion and metabolism will be understood in terms of core principles that also apply to humans. Laboratories will include directed and self-directed investigations into animal physiology using research grade data acquisition systems. Not open to students who have taken Biology 329D or BME 244L. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites: Biology 20 or 201L and Physics 141L and Chemistry 101DL


Instructor: Smith

The structure, function and evolution of the vertebrate body. Emphasis on understanding the functional, evolutionary and developmental basis for the similarities and difference observed among living vertebrates. Laboratories examining specific problems in the evolution of major organ systems through dissection, comparison and analysis of functional data.

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Rittschof

The molecular basis of behavioral and physiological responses of organisms. Evolution of molecular endocrinology and signal transduction pathways. Focus on the theory and research methodology used to study the evolution of molecular signaling and control systems. Research projects using local invertebrates to study behavioral and physiological responses to environmental signals. Field trips include night walks in local environments and marine fossil expeditions to local strip mines involved with production of fertilizer, food additives, cement, and gravel. One course (fall); one and one-half courses (summer). (Given at Beaufort.)

Prerequisites: AP Biology, introductory biology, or consent of instructor; and Chemistry 101DL


Instructor: Pei

Recent progress in sensory signal transduction mediated by calcium channels and receptors.  Topics include history and techniques in the study of ion channels, such as electrophysiology, calcium imaging, and cell and molecular biology; cell surface perception for external signals, including light receptors, olfactory receptors, taste receptors, hot and cold receptors, and mechanical receptors; heart and brain pacemakers; sensory channel receptor-related human diseases; and plan sensory signaling network.

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Carbrey and Jakoi

Modern organ physiology; cellular physiology, organ system physiology including cardiovascular, respiratory, renal gastrointestinal, endocrine, reproductive, muscle and nervous. Mini course.

Prerequisites: elementary biology.


Instructor: Astrachan, Forbes, or Rodger

Analysis, use, and design of data structures and algorithms using an object-oriented language like Java to solve computational problems. Emphasis on abstraction including interfaces and abstract data types for lists, trees, sets, tables/maps, and graphs. Implementation and evaluation of programming techniques including recursion. Intuitive and rigorous analysis of algorithms.

Prerequisites: Computer Science 101 or Engineering 110L, or equivalent.


Instructor: Carlo Tomasi

Introduction to techniques for developing, evaluating, and analyzing computational models for problems in the sciences and social sciences. Stochastic, deterministic, discrete, and continuous models. Stability of numerical approximations, parameter estimation, perturbation theory. Case studies from biology and economics.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 21, 122, 100-level Statistics.


Instructor: Nowacek

Fundamentals of marine bioacoustics with a focus on current literature and conservation issues. Topics include: introduction to acoustics; acoustic analysis methods and quantitative tools; production and recording of sound; ocean noise; propagation theory; active and passive acoustics; hearing, sound production and communication in marine organisms, potential impacts of anthropogenic noise; and regulation of marine sound. Labs will focus on methodologies used for generating, recording and analyzing marine sounds. (Given at Beaufort).

Prerequisites: AP Biology, introductory biology, or consent of instructor; Physics 141L or 161L (or equivalent Physics courses) or consent of instructor.


Instructor: Wall

Human gross anatomy seen from a functional and evolutionary perspective. Laboratory involving study of prosected cadavers and other anatomical preparations.

Prerequisites: Previous experience in anatomy (e.g., Primate Anatomy or Human Osteology) is recommended but not required.


Instructor: Brian Hare

Survey of methods/theories used in the study of human cognitive evolution; development of cognition in children; brain damaged patients; cognitive abilities of great apes; paleoanthropology of early and modern humans and evidence for mental abilities and culture; cross-cultural and sex differences in human cognition; genetics and the evolution of cognition.

Prerequisites: Evolutionary Anthropology 101 or Psychology 102.

SPRING 2016, TUTH 11:45 AM - 1:00 PM
Instructor: Christine Drea

A comparative and integrative study of primate sex and reproduction.  The material is presented in three sections: the first focuses on primate social organization, mating systems, and reproductive strategies; the second focuses on the endocrine system and behavioral endocrinology, and; the third focuses on sexual differentiation of morphology, brain and behavior.  In each section, this course places human sexuality within the broader context of the primate order.  Prerequisites:  Evolutionary Anthropology 101D or Biology 202L.

Also cross listed with BIOL 321

Prerequisites: Evolutionary Anthropology 101D or Biology 202L.


Instructor: Newcity

Examines the intersection of law and neuroscience, including the use of neuroimaging to determine if a witness is telling the truth; the implications of neuroscience for determining the mental competency of defendants, the insanity defense, the imposition of punishment on defendants. Considers the extent to which recent advances in brain science cause us to reevaluate fundamental legal concepts of "intent," "insanity," and responsibility; the ways in which neuroscience may be applied to these and related issues; and the inherent limitations and incongruities of applying brain science to legal questions

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Owen Flanagan

Such topics as mind and body, the nature of thought, perception, consciousness, personal identity, and other minds. The relevance of cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and computer science to the philosophy of mind

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Tetel

Explores the intersection of cognition and language by looking at a variety of theories of language, including: traditional models that vary according to how much the capacity for language is attributed to "the genes" or to "the environment" and newer models that question and redescribe traditional definitions of terms such as "nature," "nurture," genetic code," and "language." How traditional and new models of language interpret the capacity for language in its relationship to the neurosciences, the cognitive sciences, and the social sciences.

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Staff

Systems of linear equations, matrix operations, vector spaces, linear transformations, orthogonality, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, linear differential equations, systems of differential equations with constant coefficients, applications, computer simulations. Intended primarily for engineering students.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 202, 212 or 222. Not open to students who have had Mathematics 221 or 356r Algebra and Differential Equations


Instructor: Staff

Systems of linear equations and elementary row operations, Euclidean n-space and subspaces, linear transformations and matrix representations, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization process, determinants, eigenvectors and eigenvalues; applications. Introduction to proofs. A gateway to more advanced math courses. Not open to students who have taken Mathematics 216.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 122, 112L or 122L


Instructor: Staff

The nature and constitution of mind in humans, animals, and robots. Relation between body/mind and consciousness/cognition. Related philosophical problems about the mind: subjectivity, skepticism about other minds, relation of language to mind, and the effects of brain lesions on mental life. Readings from philosophy, psychology, neuropsychology, cognitive ethology, and artificial intelligence.

Prerequisites: Open only to students in the Focus Program


Instructor: Owen Flanagan

Such topics as mind and body, the nature of thought, perception, consciousness, personal identity, and other minds. The relevance of cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and computer science to the philosophy of mind

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Staff

n/a; occasionally

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Owen Flanagan

A study of recent work on the nature of the self and the nature and function of consciousness. Work from philosophy, psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and evolutionary biology will be discussed.

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

SPRING 2016,
Instructor: Staff

Overview of cognitive processes including pattern recognition, concept formation, attention, memory, imagery, mental representation, language, problem solving, and modes of thinking. The basic approach is both empirical (using data collection and analysis) and theoretical (building models using inductive/deductive reasoning). Application of basic laboratory results to cognition in everyday life. Students are required to participate in psychological research. Instructors: Cabeza, Day, Mitroff, or Rubin

Prerequisites: Psychology 101 strongly recommended.

SPRING 2016,
Instructor: Elizabeth Marsh

Understanding the feats and failures of memory in everyday situations.  Exploration of the use and misuse of memory of interest across professions (e.g., medicine, law, advertising, education), via demonstrations, lecture, and readings.  Topics include repression, how to study for exams, remembering names, early childhood memories, amnesia, photographic memory, eyewitness testimony, and pharmacological effects

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Staff

Principles of instrumental learning in animals and humans. Topics include elicitation, classical conditioning, reinforcement, punishment, problem solving, behavioral economics, and verbal behavior. Focus on empirical data, quantitative analysis, research methodology, and technologies generated from learning research.

Prerequisites: some knowledge of quantitative science desirable.


Instructor: Stephen Mitroff

Current research and debates in visual cognition. Topics include: visual attention and memory, role of awareness, effects of neurological disorders, and infant cognition.

Prerequisites: Psychology 102


Instructor: Staff

The biological, endocrinological, and physiological correlates of human sexual behavior including sexual differentiation, pubertal development, adult male and female sexual behavior, premenstrual syndrome, menopause, sexuality and aging, homosexuality, and deviant sexual behavior. Emphasis on the reasoning, research designs, and methods for understanding gender roles and sexuality.

Prerequisites: Psychology 106/Neuroscience 101 or background in biology.


Instructor: Schmajuk

Connectionist theories of human and animal learning and cognition applied to robotics. Neural network theories of classical conditioning; concepts of models of the environment, prediction of future events, redundancy reduction, competition for limited capacity short-term memory, mismatch between predicted and observed events, stimulus configuration, inference generation, modulation of attention by novelty, and timing. Neural networks of operant conditioning; concepts of goal-seeking mechanisms, response-selection mechanisms, and cognitive mapping. How neural network models can be used to develop psychological theories, models of the brain, and robots.

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Rosenthal,Schmajuk

Introduce students to the use computational neuroscience modeling for understanding the mechanisms involved in different psychiatric disorders (e.g., anxiety, substance abuse, post-traumatic stress disorder). In the context of computational models, we will then analyze behavioral interventions (e.g., exposure-based therapies) and pharmacological therapies (e.g., administration of haloperidol in the treatment of schizophrenia).

Prerequisites: Instructor consent required


Instructor: Terrie Moffitt, Avshalom Caspi

Introduces students to an emerging topic in behavioral science: the interaction between genes and environments. Evaluates research showing that genes influence susceptibility to the environmental causes of abnormal behavior, and research showing that genes' connections to behaviors depend on environmental experiences. Readings are primary journal articles. Topics include the design and analysis of genetic research into mental disorders, and ethical issues stemming from genetic research into human behavior. Prior coursework in statistics/research methods, genetics, and/or abnormal psychology is desirable.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor required


Instructor: Newcity

Examines the intersection of law and neuroscience, including the use of neuroimaging to determine if a witness is telling the truth; the implications of neuroscience for determining the mental competency of defendants, the insanity defense, the imposition of punishment on defendants. Considers the extent to which recent advances in brain science cause us to reevaluate fundamental legal concepts of "intent," "insanity," and responsibility; the ways in which neuroscience may be applied to these and related issues; and the inherent limitations and incongruities of applying brain science to legal questions

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.


Instructor: Owen Flanagan

Such topics as mind and body, the nature of thought, perception, consciousness, personal identity, and other minds. The relevance of cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and computer science to the philosophy of mind

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

Electives: Focus Courses

Fall 2017, TUTH 10:05 AM - 11:20 AM
Instructor: Edna Andrews

Same as Linguist 216S; open only to students in the Focus Program.

AoK: NS, SS

Prerequisites: Advanced placement credit in Biology.

Fall 2015, TUTH 08:30 AM - 09:45 AM
Instructor: David Brizel

Study of neurological breakdowns due to lesions from benign and malignant brain tumors, epilepsy (w/without lesions), head/neck cancer. Includes fundamentals of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and head/neck physiology. Explores important diagnostic and research procedures, including cortical stimulation mapping, innovations in radiation therapy, surgery, molecular targeting, imaging, minimizing side effects of treatment, clinical trials. Topics include neurocognitive variation across patients with focus on memory and language, cortical and network abnormalities in criminal psychopathy, oncology and the human papilloma virus, and radiation/surgical treatments for head and neck cancer.

Prerequisites: See dept website for placement info.

Fall 2017, MW 10:05 AM - 11:20 AM
Instructor: Nicole Schramm-Sapyta

Exploration of the relationship between addictive drugs and the law. Examine mechanisms by which drugs of abuse affect the brain and decision-making on the individual level, and consequences of those effects on the societal level, then examine how society responds to these behaviors in terms of attitudes and laws. Compare perspectives of the criminal justice system with that of drug users. Class consists of lectures, discussions, guest speakers, and media presentations and a project examining cross-generational views on drug use, abuse, and laws. Open only to students in the Focus Program.

AoK: SS

Prerequisites: Instructor consent required.

TUTH 04:40 PM - 05:55 PM
Instructor: Dale Purves

Course will explore the remarkable phenomenology of visual perception and its neural basis. Open only to students in FOCUS program. Director of Undergraduate Studies consent required.

Prerequisites: Some background in neuroscience is desirable.

MWF 01:40 PM - 02:30 PM
Instructor: William Hall

Introduction to the fundamental principles of brain organization and mechanisms.

AoK: NS


Prerequisites: Open only to students in the Focus Program.

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